COVID-19 Cases, Hospitalizations Continue Decline In Arizona
Key metrics for tracking the spread of the coronavirus in Arizona continue to trend in the right direction, Gov. Doug Ducey said Thursday.
Mild Hurricane Season Contributes To AZ Heat Wave
Arizonans are used to hot summers, but not the “rare, dangerous and deadly” conditions that have prompted the National Weather Service to issue an excessive heat warning through Monday. What drives these events?
Jul. 31, 2020
Corporation Commission Considers Switch To Carbon-Free Sources
Arizona utility regulators are considering a significant change to the state’s renewable energy requirements — a change long sought by advocates since the standards were first adopted more than a decade ago. The Corporation Commission could vote July 30 on proposals that would mandate utilities get their power from carbon-free sources — eventually, anyway.
Jul. 30, 2020
Pima Health Department Warns Against Early Reopening For Schools
While the rate of new coronavirus cases has slowed some, Arizona remains a hot spot. This has only sustained tensions about when and how students should return to school this fall. In Pima County, the health department says it’s unsafe to return to face-to-face learning in Tucson.
Jul. 30, 2020
Task Force Will Develop Recommendations To Reopen Nursing Homes
Arizona Gov. Doug Ducey announced the creation of a task force that will develop recommendations on how to resume visits at long-term care facilities. Many nursing homes and assisted living facilities have restricted visits due to the coronavirus pandemic.
Jul. 29, 2020
Deaf, Hard Of Hearing Commission Urges Clear Masks Use
Wearing a mask over your nose and mouth is one small way to help mitigate the spread of COVID-19 — as we’ve heard numerous times through this pandemic. The public health benefits are clear, but there has been at least one unintended consequence for communication. Many deaf and hard of hearing individuals read lips and facial expressions for more clear communication or context.
Jul. 29, 2020
Is Valley Air Cleaner When More Of Us Work From Home?
The coronavirus has kept Americans off the freeways and in their homes. In some places, that has led to cleaner air. But it’s more complicated in the Valley.
Jul. 28, 2020
Moderna Includes AZ In Expanded Coronavirus Vaccine Trials
Two weeks ago, Moderna published the results of the first human trials of a coronavirus vaccine by an American company. On Monday, the biotech firm began the process of expanding testing to 30,000 volunteers at 89 sites nationwide — four of them in Arizona.
Jul. 28, 2020
Anthropologists Study History Of Disease Through Teeth
Most people are familiar with the bubonic plague, which killed tens of millions in Europe. But anthropologists are finding that pandemics have a long history, one that may go back to the Stone Age.
Jul. 28, 2020
Gila River Community Aims To Bounce Back From Pandemic Losses
Arizona’s tribal communities have been some of the hardest hit during the pandemic. Numbers of cases in Indian Country have soared, putting pressure on their often already stressed health care systems and economies. The Show spoke with Gov. Stephen Roe Lewis of the Gila River Indian Community more about how his tribe has fared during the pandemic.
Jul. 28, 2020
Officials Fear Rains Will Trigger Flooding In Areas Hit By Wildfires
After a lightning strike in early June, the Bighorn Fire burned nearly 120,000 acres outside of Tucson, forcing people to evacuate their homes. But the danger from the fire isn’t over. In early July, authorities announced Mount Lemmon and Sabino Canyon outside of Tucson will close because of the danger not of fire, but of flooding.
Jul. 28, 2020
Demand Drops As Arizonans Experience Long Waits For COVID Results
Many Arizonans have been reporting long delays in the time it takes to get COVID-19 test results, some waiting as long as two weeks. At least one testing provider said it’s no longer working with one of the state’s largest labs, Sonora Quest, because of extended wait times.
Jul. 28, 2020
Prescott National Forest Mineral Withdrawal Expires
Two decades ago the National Forest Service banned mining in parts of the Southwest for ecological or recreational reasons. Some of those so called “mineral withdrawals” are expiring this year.
Jul. 28, 2020
ASU To Launch Cameras Aboard New Mars Rover, Emirates Orbiter
When NASA’s latest Mars rover, Perseverance, launches, it will carry another camera designed and operated by Arizona State University.
Jul. 27, 2020
We Kind Of Blew It: Start Dates For Pac-12 Sports In Flux
The Pac-12 Conference has been in a holding pattern as leaders try to figure out what the 2020 college football season could look like. The conference is expected to officially announce that games will begin on September 19 and schools will only be playing against Pac-12 opponents. But the continued impact of the virus could cause that date to change.
Jul. 27, 2020
The Dangers To Arizonas Health Care System Of A Census Undercount
The results of the U.S. census help decide everything from the number of seats the state will have in Congress to the amount of federal money it gets for a variety of programs. But there are concerns about a potential undercount. One of the areas that would be impacted by an undercount, and thus receive less federal money, is health and health care.
Jul. 27, 2020
Expert: AZ Needs To Close More High-Risk Businesses
Arizona reported another 1,813 new cases of COVID-19 July 27, bringing the total number of cases to nearly 164,000. For more on what we’re seeing at this point in the pandemic — and whether there is any light at the end of the tunnel — The Show spoke with Dr. Farshad Fani Marvasti.
Jul. 27, 2020
Study: Moms Reduced Work Hours More Than Dads During Pandemic
Researchers from Washington University in St. Louis looked at the changes in work hours from February through April. They found that mothers with young children reduced their work hours four to five times more than fathers.
Jul. 27, 2020
COVID-19 Study Offers Early Hope For Safe Breastfeeding
Breastfeeding and skin contact promote a baby's short-and long-term health. But mothers with COVID-19 have received conflicting guidance regarding the safety of such practices. Now, a preliminary study offers some heartening results.
Jul. 24, 2020
Navajo See Farming Renaissance 5 Years After Mine Spill
Five years ago an EPA crew investigating a mine in Colorado accidentally unleashed 3 million gallons of metal-contaminated waste into the southwest river system. Downstream hundreds of Navajo quit farming as a result. But that’s changed in recent months as the tribe became one of the hardest hit by the coronavirus.
Jul. 29, 2020
How Reflective Paint Can Combat The Urban Heat Island Effect
Phoenix has started a pilot program aimed at mitigating the urban heat island by applying cool pavement to a number of streets and a park. City officials said the cool pavement has the potential to reverse increasingly warmer nighttime temperatures.
Jul. 24, 2020