Politics

POLITICS

Here are all the bills Hobbs has vetoed so far in 2024
Hobbs, who's a Democrat and broke the state's veto record in 2023, says the legislation that she is vetoing is extreme, and denied accusations that her office refuses to work with Republicans.
James "Jim" Patrick Weiers, former Republican speaker of the Arizona House of Representatives, died on Friday at age 70.
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The Senate Ethics Committee won’t hold a hearing to investigate accusations that Republican leaders in the chamber violated Senate rules when they ignored Democrats’ efforts to repeal the state’s near-total abortion ban.
Rep. David Cook says enough Republicans will join with Democrats in the Arizona House next week and vote to repeal Arizona’s near-total abortion ban.
Democratic Gov. Katie Hobbs has vetoed more bills than any other governor in Arizona history.
A Republican state lawmaker made good on a promise to invite Taylor Swift to attend a bill signing ceremony for two pieces of legislation inspired by the pop superstar.
On Thursday, in a unanimous vote, the NHL officially approved the Arizona Coyotes’ relocation to Salt Lake City. Tempe Councilman Randy Keating says he’s glad they did.
Coyotes fans share their memories at last game in Mullet Arena
A bill that would require schools to have separate showers for transgender students so that other students aren't exposed to them is on the way to Gov. Katie Hobbs' desk after the Senate gave it final approval on Wednesday.
A new study examined the effect of various factors on the health of Arizona adolescents that researchers divided into five main categories that include physical and mental health, education and workforce development, environment and climate, economic well-being, and family and community.
Gov. Katie Hobbs vetoed 13 bills on Tuesday, bringing her total to 42 so far this session. One bill aimed to define male and female in state law, and would have removed any reference to the word “gender” in statutes.
Lawmakers in the Arizona Senate took a first step today toward repealing Arizona’s near-total ban on abortion that dates back to 1864.
More Arizona politics news
Haley Coles is executive director of Sonoran Prevention Works, which works in harm reduction for drug users in Arizona. She told The Show she doesn’t think tougher sentences will work to prevent fentanyl overdoses — but there’s a lot that would.
Pima County supervisors pass resolution against 1864 abortion ban
The resolution says that law infringes on the reproductive rights and autonomy of Arizona residents. It calls on county attorneys, law enforcement agencies and medical professionals statewide to allow residents to pursue healthcare — including abortions.
Arizona Attorney General Kris Mayes says the earliest the state’s near-total abortion ban could take effect is June 8. When the state Supreme Court last week said Arizona should follow an 1864 ban on nearly all abortions, questions remained about when it would actually go into effect.
Republican state lawmakers last week blocked an effort by Democrats to vote on a repeal of the 1864 near-total abortion ban. One of the legislators who opposed that move says he’ll vote for it.
Speaking at the Phoenix Convention Center Monday, Phoenix Mayor Kate Gallego touted the impact of the NCAA Men’s Final Four. According to Gallego, the tournament and surrounding events drew roughly 300,000 visitors to downtown Phoenix earlier this month.
Republicans at the Arizona Legislature may refer multiple proposals to the ballot in an effort to undermine a citizen-led effort to put the right to abortion in the Arizona Constitution, according to documents leaked from the state Capitol.
Last week, the Arizona State Supreme Court ordered the enforcement of a law from 1864 banning nearly all abortions. That's led both presidential campaigns to focus on the battleground state.
As budget talks start to get moving at the Arizona Capitol, some lawmakers were keeping an eye on new numbers that would paint an updated picture of the state’s financial situation.
Despite last week’s ruling by the Arizona Supreme Court that the state’s 1864 near-total ban on abortions supersedes a more recent 15-week ban, there are still lots of questions about what comes next, legally — and when.
Conventional wisdom says the Arizona Supreme Court’s abortion ruling will hurt Republicans in the November election. But Arizona Republic columnist Phil Boas thinks all of this might actually be useful for the GOP.