NPR News

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Trade adviser Peter Navarro's USA Today opinion piece says the infectious disease expert has been wrong about coronavirus. A White House official says Navarro "went rogue."
July 15, 2020
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Despite its limited resources, Rwanda has vowed to identify every case. So you could be walking down the street and a health worker will ask if you want to be tested.
July 15, 2020
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In the nation's capital, the coronavirus has killed Black residents at 5.9 times the rate of white people — a disparity that's worse than any other big city in America with published demographic data.
July 15, 2020
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In a night of primaries, President Trump's personal physician Ronny Jackson secured a nomination to represent a Texas congressional district and Jeff Sessions lost a bid to regain his Senate seat.
July 15, 2020
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Sessions loses to former football coach Tommy Tuberville, who was endorsed by President Trump. He faces Democrat Sen. Doug Jones, considered vulnerable, in November.
July 15, 2020
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Seven multi-million-dollar contracts are at the center of a House subcommittee probe. Investigators say the companies lacked experience and some had political connections to the Trump administration.
July 15, 2020
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The court's conservative justices wrote separately a lot, often just for themselves. Meanwhile, the court's liberals let their victories speak for themselves and dissented as a bloc.
July 15, 2020
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President Trump is making major changes to a bedrock environmental law that he says will help the economy. Critics say the move will sideline input from communities affected by polluting projects.
July 15, 2020
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Though anxiety has increased in the U.S. in recent months, a drastic spike in loneliness that psychologists expected hasn't emerged. People seem to be finding new ways to connect, researchers say.
July 15, 2020
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Hikers were advised to put their dreams of walking all 2,190 miles on hold because of the pandemic. But some people decided to stay the course to the consternation of public health safety advocates.
July 15, 2020
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China promised to retaliate against "U.S. institutions and individuals" after President Trump signed the Hong Kong Autonomy Act and an executive order rescinding special treatment for the territory.
July 15, 2020
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A federal appellate court temporarily blocked a lower-court order to shut down and empty the controversial oil pipeline. The operator, Energy Transfer, can continue pumping while the case is pending.
July 15, 2020
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Sen. Tammy Duckworth, D-Ill., had demanded proof that Lt. Col. Alexander Vindman, who retired last week, was included on a list of more than 1,000 officers submitted to the White House for promotion.
July 14, 2020
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The judge on Tuesday said it was unfair to include women who'd merely met Weinstein with those making more grievous charges. "Your settlement would create inequality among all of those people."
July 14, 2020
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To produce citizenship data that can be used when voting districts are redrawn, the Trump administration asked states to share their records. South Dakota agreed to do so in April, NPR has learned.
July 14, 2020

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