KJZZ News

Tesla Announces Battery Day And Electric Semitruck Plan
Tesla is ramping up power production to put long-haul vehicles on the electric highway system by the end of the year. During the company's earnings call Wednesday, CEO Elon Musk announced plans to produce "limited volumes" of its electric semitruck in 2020 for long-haul trips.
Jan. 31, 2020
The Pulse: Hair And Our Health
Many African-American women use relaxers to straighten their hair. Reporter Micah Hazel never tried that, she always liked her hair natural. But in college she became obsessed with another hair attribute: length.
Jan. 31, 2020
Iowa Hopes To Increase Participation With Satellite Caucuses
This year, Iowa Democrats are allowing what they’re calling satellite caucuses. They’re places for people to go to participate that aren’t their regular neighborhood precincts — including snowbirds who spend their winters in Arizona.
Jan. 31, 2020
50 Female Inmates To Mens Prison
The Arizona Department of Corrections has moved 50 female inmates to a reopened unit at a men’s prison to deal with overcrowding at the Perryville women’s prison. A spokesman for Department of Corrections said the inmates were relocated to the recently reopened minimum custody Papago Unit at the Douglas prison this week.
Jan. 30, 2020
Phoenix Gets $1 Million To Get Rid Of 10 Garbage Trucks
The city of Phoenix is getting rid of some of its garbage trucks and earning a million dollars to do it. Mayor Kate Gallego announced the Cleaner Trucks initiative, a project partnered with the EPA to reduce pollutants in the air. Ten diesel garbage trucks in Phoenix are set to be permanently removed and replaced with ultra-low nitrogen oxide emission vehicles.
Jan. 30, 2020
CDC Confirms 1st Person-To-Person Transmission Of Novel Coronavirus In U.S.
The CDC has confirmed the first person-to-person transmission of novel coronavirus in the United States. The new case is in Illinois and is the spouse of a patient who recently traveled to China.
Jan. 30, 2020
Four Corners Drought Intensified By Climate Change
The Four Corners drought of 2017 and 2018 caused $3 billion in losses and led the Navajo Nation to issue an emergency drought declaration. Now, new research suggests a sizable portion of the drought’s impacts stemmed from human-induced climate change.
Jan. 30, 2020
Tough Love: How Susan Rice Sees Division In America
Former U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations Susan Rice experienced the deep disagreements of the civil rights and Vietnam eras as a child — and up close working in the Clinton and Obama administrations. Rice has written about her life and career in the new book, "Tough Love."
Jan. 30, 2020
Wreckage Of  Bryant Copter Crash Transported To Phoenix
The wreckage of the helicopter crash that killed nine people including former NBA star Kobe Bryant in Calabasas, California, last Sunday has been transported to Arizona. The S-76 aircraft is currently under investigation by a full-go team consisting of more than 30 individuals who specialize in different factors such as maintenance, engines, airframe and meteorology.
Jan. 30, 2020
Report Calls Out Lax Safety Culture At Southwest Airlines
A soon-to-be-released audit says Dallas-based Southwest Airlines failed to confirm maintenance records for planes carrying upwards of 17 million passengers. The report raises concerns about how the Federal Aviation Administration monitors airline safety.
Jan. 30, 2020
Why Tiny Habits Lead To Big Life Changes
BJ Fogg of Stanford University’s Behavior Design Lab has studied human behavior and data for years, and his new book "Tiny Habits" explains how improving our lives comes down to little, consistent changes rather than completely upending what we do.
Jan. 30, 2020
AZ Commerce Authority Responds to Questions About Impact of Tax Incentives
At a meeting last year, lawmakers from both parties questioned officials from the Arizona Commerce Authority about what the state was getting for the hundreds of millions of dollars in tax credits it was awarding.
Jan. 30, 2020
How American Dirt Exposes Diversity Problems Among Publishers And Critics
Jeanine Cummins' "American Dirt" tells the story of a Mexican woman and her son who become migrants fleeing to the U.S.-Mexico border. But, not long after it was released to critical acclaim and named to Oprah’s Book Club list, the criticism started to pour in.
Jan. 30, 2020
Ideas Of Maps, Power Shape ASU Resident Artists Work
Carolina Aranibar-Fernandez is an artist who believes in community. She was born in Bolivia and now is the resident artist for the Binational Arts Residency at Arizona State University. Her work centers around the idea of maps and power. She often actually traces the flows of commodities — metals, crops, oil, coca leaves and more.
Jan. 30, 2020
ASU Police Chief: Sexual Assaults That Did Not Lead To Alerts Determined To Not Be Ongoing Threats
Late last year, there were four sexual assaults that took place at ASU that did not lead to alerts from the university’s police department.
Jan. 30, 2020
Interior Dept. Stops Using Chinese-Made Drones Amid Espionage Concerns
The Department of Interior won’t use Chinese-made drones or drones with Chinese parts, except in emergency situations. The federal agency issued the new policy this week over concerns that drones can be used for Chinese espionage.
Jan. 30, 2020
How Is Labor Market Faring Amid Good Jobless Rate?
Nearly half of all Americans between the ages of 16 and 64 do not earn enough money to live on — about $18,000 per year. And the numbers for the Phoenix metro area mirror the national ones: about 44% of workers in that age range, or roughly 730,000 low-wage workers.
Jan. 30, 2020
Lots Of Water Bills At AZ Legislature This Year
Arizona lawmakers have proposed many water related bills that would have wide reaching effects — from metering big wells to banning certain transfers from the Colorado River.
Jan. 30, 2020
Families Of Incarcerated People Fear Water At Douglas Prison Is Contaminated Again
Once again, families of inmates living at the Douglas prison say their loved ones are reporting drinking water that smells and tastes like diesel fuel. In October 2019, after inmates in the Douglas prison made similar complaints of brown, foul smelling water, the Arizona Department of Corrections confirmed water at the prison had a “noticeable petroleum odor and taste.”
Jan. 30, 2020
The Takeaway: Despite Its Troubled History, The Border Patrol Is Training Kids To Apprehend Migrants
The U.S. Border Patrol has, for decades, operated a program called the "Border Patrol Explorers," which teaches teenagers ages 14 to 18, to carry out enforcement work.
Jan. 30, 2020

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