KJZZ News

Urban Planners Looking To Standardize Heat Maps
It only recently became spring, but triple-digit temperatures aren’t all that far off here in the Valley. And, as cities and residents start planning for that heat, some of them will turn to heat maps, which track which parts of a city are hotter than others.
July 5, 2019
Uncaged Art: Exhibit Presents Artwork Created By Detained Immigrant Children
As thousands of children have come to the U.S.-Mexico border seeking asylum in recent years, the U.S. government has housed many of them in detention camps.
July 5, 2019
Can Museums Effect Change In Society?
The power of museums — and how relevant they are — isn’t exactly up for debate. But some have wondered how active those community spaces and their leaders need to be when it comes to addressing the issues of our time.
July 5, 2019
Does Modern Technology Actually Make Our Lives More Efficient?
It's conventional wisdom that technology can make us more efficient — dishwashers save us time in front of the sink and algorithms can help find a compatible mate. But The Show's guest isn’t so sure that the latest and greatest tech these days is making us more efficient.
July 5, 2019
How
Most people don't have jobs where they're able to challenge the status quo or do things that don't fit neatly into a corporate package and the emotional response could be to throw up your hands, say "forget this" and start looking for another place to work, or even more dramatically, you decide to follow your dream. But there are more practical ways to act and practical doesn't have to mean boring or by the numbers.
July 5, 2019
Phoenix Parking Meters To Help Homeless
As many as 20 parking meters will be installed at four downtown intersections but not a single one will provide parking. Later this month, Phoenix plans to launch a pilot program to help people experiencing homelessness.
July 5, 2019
Gardens Offer More Than A Wing And A Prayer To Troubled Monarch Butterflies
The last two years have not been kind to the monarch butterflies living along the West Coast. The population of the iconic insect may have fallen below a critical level.
July 5, 2019
Mexico’s President Congratulates U.S. On Fourth Of July
President Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador of Mexico commemorated the United States' Independence Day on Thursday, saying he hopes the two countries will have friendship and cooperation.
July 5, 2019
Tomato Imports Still Up After Duties Were Imposed
Despite a significant tariff in place, Mexican tomato imports have not yet declined as some feared. For now two months in a row, Mexican tomato import weights have increased year-over-year through Nogales since a nearly 18% tariff was imposed in early May.
July 5, 2019
Ex-Schools Chief Accuses Hoffman, Hobbs Of Promoting Pedophilia
Arizona’s former head of public schools, Diane Douglas, has accused her successor, Kathy Hoffman, and Secretary of State Katie Hobbs of promoting pedophilia. “I was appalled,” Superintendent of Public Instruction Kathy Hoffman said. “I found the comments to be abhorrent and deeply offensive. … It’s incredibly damaging to the LGBTQ community and anyone who is a victim of sexual abuse.”
July 4, 2019
Some On Corp Comm Want APS To Answer Policy Questions
While Arizona Corporation Commission documents show APS has settled out of court on two heat-related death cases, members of the regulatory commission want more answers into a third.
July 4, 2019
Game Changer Project Near Indian School Park
Big changes are coming to a key intersection in Phoenix. On Wednesday, the City Council approved a zoning change for the northeast corner of Central Avenue and Indian School Road.
July 4, 2019
Love Your Neighborhood Revitalizes West Mesa Areas
The "Love Your Neighborhood" program targeted homes near Main Street and Country Club Drive based on data about vacancies, blight and crime. “Helping those of low income in getting their places to look really nice kind of spurred those people that could afford it, but just didn’t have the motivation to do so."
July 4, 2019
APS Admits 2 More Deaths After Power Disconnections
The state's largest electric utility is telling its regulators that two more customers died after their power was disconnected for not paying their bills. Arizona Public Service told the state Corporation Commission Wednesday that it settled lawsuits stemming from deaths last July and in 2011.
July 4, 2019
Polygamous Town Contractor Must Pay $1M To Child Workers
A judge has ordered a contractor with ties to a polygamous group on the Utah-Arizona border to pay more than $1 million in back wages to children who prosecutors say were forced to pick pecans from 2008-2013.
July 4, 2019
Border Agent With Long List Of Complaints Heads To Trial In Arizona
Authorities say after he ran down Antonin Lopez twice with his agency vehicle, Border Patrol Agent Matthew Bowen texted a co-worker. "Just a little push with a Ford bumper," he wrote, prosecutors say.
July 4, 2019
Flagstaff Selects Greg Clifton As New City Manager
It appears the "third time's a charm" for the city of Flagstaff in its quest to hire a new city manager. Out of more than 50 candidates and three rounds of searches, Flagstaff has offered the role to Greg Clifton.
July 4, 2019
Author On Reclaiming American Resistance
For many, the philosophy of resistance took hold prior to the American Revolution and should still be a significant part of our culture today. One of those is Jeff Biggers, author of the new book "Resistance: Reclaiming an American Tradition," who joined The Show to talk about his work.
July 4, 2019
A Human Network: How Our Social Connections Determine Who We Are
Matthew O. Jackson didn’t want his book, “The Human Network: How Your Social Position Determines Your Power, Beliefs and Behaviors,” to be confused with “The Social Network” or Mark Zuckerberg and Facebook. In fact, his work focuses on a much broader idea than social media.
July 4, 2019
Author: The Story Of The American Indian Is Not Just Tragedy
Dee Brown’s 1970 book "Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee" remains today the best-selling book about Native American life and history ever published. But, writer and scholar David Treuer knows that Native American life did not, in fact, end at Wounded Knee.
July 4, 2019

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