KJZZ News

The Business Of Books: Phoenix-Area Bookstores Connecting Communities
It’s a narrative often repeated: Amazon is killing bookstores. Over the last decade, big chains like Borders, B Dalton and Waldenbooks have all closed their doors. But the number of local, independent bookstores has increased. In this five-part series, meet the people behind metro Phoenix's independent stores and learn how they've adapted in the ever changing marketplace.
Apr. 21, 2019
Arizona Supports Waters Of U.S. Rule Change, But Wants Delay
The state of Arizona supports a proposed federal rule change redefining what’s considered a “Water of the United States,” but is asking the Environmental Protection Agency and the Army Corps of Engineers to hold off on putting the rule in place.
Apr. 20, 2019
South Phoenix Wildlife Refuge Home To Feather Conservatory For Native Americans
Program allows Native Americans to request and obtain, for free, bird feathers and carcasses safely.
Apr. 20, 2019
ASU Announces E-Cigarette, Vaping Ban
Arizona State University is the latest public university extending its smoking ban to include e-cigarettes and other vaping devices. Both the University of Arizona and Northern Arizona University have similar bans in place already.
Apr. 20, 2019
Explosion At APS Facility In Surprise Injures Firefighters
Authorities are investigating an explosion Friday evening that injured four firefighters at an Arizona Public Service Co. facility in a Phoenix suburb.
Apr. 20, 2019
Taxpayer Bill From Arpaio Profiling Case To Reach $150M By Mid-2020
The taxpayer bill for a racial profiling case stemming from former Sheriff Joe Arpaio's immigration patrols in metropolitan Phoenix is expected to reach nearly $150 million by the summer of 2020.
Apr. 19, 2019
Tucson Takes In Asylum Seekers
For months, federal immigration agents have dropped off asylum seekers at churches and shelters in cities along the entire U.S.-Mexico border. Some of those are now full and the burden is being picked up by taxpayers in border region cities.
Apr. 19, 2019
MCSO Is Running Community Meetings In Racial Profiling Case, Federal Judge Says It Falls Short
Judge Murray Snow said Friday that while progress has been made, the meetings run by the Sheriff’s Office have fallen short. He says they have failed, in a reasonable way, to address the Latino communities affected. So, Judge Snow said the meetings should be, again, run by the monitor to be more effective.
Apr. 19, 2019
Researchers Find 2 Million Previously Unknown Tiny Earthquakes In Southern California
California’s three major fault lines may have had a century off from major earthquakes, but a new study shows that Southern California is teeming with tiny temblors.
Apr. 19, 2019
$220 Million Available To Cleanup Navajo Uranium Mines
The federal government seeks proposals from businesses to clean up abandoned uranium mines on the Navajo Nation. But some say Navajo-owned businesses aren’t big enough to handle the project. The EPA plans to parse out $220 million to multiple "small businesses."
Apr. 19, 2019
Changes Coming After Phoenix Police Officer Shooting Study
Phoenix Police Chief Jeri Williams says she’s committed to following nine recommendations from an outside group that studied her officers’ actions.
Apr. 19, 2019
Report: New NAFTA Would Bring Growth, Employment Gains
If enacted, the renegotiated NAFTA deal could grow the U.S. economy and bring modest jumps in employment, according to a new report from the U.S. International Trade Commission.
Apr. 19, 2019
Campground At Roosevelt Lake Temporarily Closed
The spring rains may have been too much of a good thing. A popular camping area at Roosevelt Lake is closed until further notice because the lake level has risen.
Apr. 19, 2019
Biodiversity Roadmap Calls For Conserving Ecosystems To Save The World
The Paris Agreement helped steer nations around the world away from a carbon cliff. But a paper in the journal “Science Advances” argues it will be a dead end unless nations also preserve Earth’s ecosystems.
Apr. 19, 2019
Scottsdale CC Series Shines Light On Genocides Of The Past, Present And Future
Scottsdale Community College is wrapping up a series of events and discussions for its seventh annual Genocide Awareness Week.
Few Remaining Arizona Holocaust Survivors Gather In Scottsdale To 'Never Forget'
Apr. 19, 2019
The Takeaway: The Mueller Report Is Not The End, It
It’s been a long (almost) two years but the Special Counsel’s investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 election, possible coordination between the Trump Campaign and Russia, and obstruction of justice has reached its final culmination. The redacted report was released on Thursday.
Apr. 19, 2019
Maricopa County Is Fastest Growing, But Planners Expecting More
Maricopa County is the country’s fastest growing county. Between 2017 and 2018, the county added more than 81,000 residents. That brings Maricopa County’s population up to more than 4.4 million, which makes it the fourth most populous county in the U.S.
Apr. 19, 2019
How Much Does Our DNA Affect Who We Are?
How much are we our DNA? And how much does heredity have to do with just our genetics? Those are among the questions Carl Zimmer explores in his new book. Zimmer writes the “Matter” column for the New York Times and is the author of "She Has Her Mother’s Laugh: The Powers, Perversions and Potential of Heredity."
Apr. 19, 2019
Maricopa County Attorney Responds To LUCHA Protests
On Thursday, The Show spoke with a representative of activist group LUCHA (Living United for Change) about their protest outside of the Maricopa County Attorney’s Office this week. They say the office is a major factor in Arizona’s fourth-highest incarceration rate.
Apr. 19, 2019
What Does It Mean To Rebuild Notre Dame Cathedral?
In the wake of the massive fire that destroyed much of the iconic Notre Dame Cathedral in Paris earlier this week, a debate has emerged about what it means to rebuild it authentically.
Apr. 19, 2019

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