KJZZ News

How American Dirt Exposes Diversity Problems Among Publishers And Critics
Jeanine Cummins' "American Dirt" tells the story of a Mexican woman and her son who become migrants fleeing to the U.S.-Mexico border. But, not long after it was released to critical acclaim and named to Oprah’s Book Club list, the criticism started to pour in.
Jan. 30, 2020
Ideas Of Maps, Power Shape ASU Resident Artists Work
Carolina Aranibar-Fernandez is an artist who believes in community. She was born in Bolivia and now is the resident artist for the Binational Arts Residency at Arizona State University. Her work centers around the idea of maps and power. She often actually traces the flows of commodities — metals, crops, oil, coca leaves and more.
Jan. 30, 2020
ASU Police Chief: Sexual Assaults That Did Not Lead To Alerts Determined To Not Be Ongoing Threats
Late last year, there were four sexual assaults that took place at ASU that did not lead to alerts from the university’s police department.
Jan. 30, 2020
Interior Dept. Stops Using Chinese-Made Drones Amid Espionage Concerns
The Department of Interior won’t use Chinese-made drones or drones with Chinese parts, except in emergency situations. The federal agency issued the new policy this week over concerns that drones can be used for Chinese espionage.
Jan. 30, 2020
How Is Labor Market Faring Amid Good Jobless Rate?
Nearly half of all Americans between the ages of 16 and 64 do not earn enough money to live on — about $18,000 per year. And the numbers for the Phoenix metro area mirror the national ones: about 44% of workers in that age range, or roughly 730,000 low-wage workers.
Jan. 30, 2020
Lots Of Water Bills At AZ Legislature This Year
Arizona lawmakers have proposed many water related bills that would have wide reaching effects — from metering big wells to banning certain transfers from the Colorado River.
Jan. 30, 2020
Families Of Incarcerated People Fear Water At Douglas Prison Is Contaminated Again
Once again, families of inmates living at the Douglas prison say their loved ones are reporting drinking water that smells and tastes like diesel fuel. In October 2019, after inmates in the Douglas prison made similar complaints of brown, foul smelling water, the Arizona Department of Corrections confirmed water at the prison had a “noticeable petroleum odor and taste.”
Jan. 30, 2020
The Takeaway: Despite Its Troubled History, The Border Patrol Is Training Kids To Apprehend Migrants
The U.S. Border Patrol has, for decades, operated a program called the "Border Patrol Explorers," which teaches teenagers ages 14 to 18, to carry out enforcement work.
Jan. 30, 2020
Arizona License Plate Program For Hybrid Drivers Ends March 2
In about a month, Arizona’s Energy Efficient Plate Program will require some drivers to change lanes. Drivers of hybrid vehicles will no longer be issued special license plates starting March 2.
Jan. 30, 2020
Senate Panel: Cities Cant Stop Developers From Using Natural Gas
A Senate panel decided Wednesday that cities cannot forbid developers from constructing new buildings that use natural gas. The decision by the Senate Committee on Natural Resources was popular with restaurant owners.
Jan. 30, 2020
Bill Could Fund Dental For Pregnant Women on AHCCCS
A bill is moving through the Arizona Senate that would appropriate funds to cover dental cleanings for pregnant women who are on the state’s Medicaid program.
Jan. 30, 2020
Arizona AG Leads Multi-State Fight Against Google Wi-Spy Settlement
Arizona Attorney General Mark Brnovich is urging a federal judge to toss out a class-action settlement with Google, claiming a lawsuit involving the Street View mapping technology blamed for massive violations of consumer privacy still owes damages.
Jan. 30, 2020
Arizona AG Gives $400K To Support Mental Health Of First Responders
The Arizona Attorney General’s office is giving $400,000 in grants to organizations that provide mental health resources and training for first responders. Their goal is to help firefighters and police officers who may develop depression, PTSD or other disorders after dealing with traumatic events. Organizations eligible for the grant money can receive up to $100,000 to support responders.
Jan. 29, 2020
Phoenix Sky Harbor Airport To Host Farewell For Terminal 2
Terminal 2 at Phoenix’s Sky Harbor Airport is closing. But curious members of the public can visit the terminal and view the large scale mural, "The Phoenix," one last time.
Phoenix Leaders Unveil John McCain Plaque At Sky Harbor
Jan. 29, 2020
How Arizonas Water Future Impacts Its Food Future
Phoenix is a desert city, and as climate change continues to heat up the Southwest, water will become ever more essential. In his latest piece, Arizona food writer and Phoenix New Times contributor Chris Malloy digs into the issue of our region’s water future — and how it affects our food future as well.
Jan. 29, 2020
9th Circuit Allows Fine In AZ Prison Health Settlement
The 9th Circuit Court of Appeals has ruled against the Arizona Department of Corrections, allowing a $1.4 million fine for poor health care in state prisons to stand. The court handed down a unanimous opinion Wednesday rejecting the Department of Corrections’ appeals of several district court orders in the Parsons vs. Ryan prison health care case. The court handed down a unanimous opinion Wednesday.
Jan. 29, 2020
¡Americano!: DACA Musical Premieres In Phoenix
On Wednesday night, an original musical premieres at the Phoenix Theatre. "¡Americano!" is the true story of Antonio Valdovinos de la Mora, an undocumented immigrant who became a recipient of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program. The Show got a behind-the-scenes look at the production.
Jan. 29, 2020
How Should Big Cities Handle Homeless Encampments?
That 9th U.S. Circuit ruling that said cities cannot criminalize homelessness is enforceable throughout the entire judicial district, including in Arizona. So, how is law enforcement here approaching people who are living on the streets in light of it? And what else is needed to fix the problem?
Jan. 29, 2020
Digital Citadels Of Confirming Information: Scott Pelley
The relationship between public officials and the press has taken a few hits recently. That relationship is something Scott Pelley has been thinking a lot about. The "60 Minutes" correspondent and former anchor of the CBS Evening News has a new book called "Truth Worth Telling: A Reporter’s Search for Meaning in the Stories of Our Times."
Jan. 29, 2020
Journalist Explores Challenges Of Criminal Justice Reform
Mass incarceration continues to be a public policy and cultural concern in the U.S., as the nation has the highest rate of incarceration in the world. New York Times Magazine journalist Emily Bazelon has written about the challenges in her book "Charged: The New Movement to Transform American Prosecution and End Mass Incarceration."
Jan. 29, 2020

Pages