NPR News

One group demands that "not one more life be ended by senseless gun violence." The two main groups leading the march are funded in part by former New York mayor Michael Bloomberg.
June 14, 2014
The elephant Satao was known as a tusker, because his tusks were so large, they almost touched the ground. A conservation group identified Satao despite his mutilated carcass.
June 14, 2014
The group Invisible Children shot to fame after its video "Kony 2012" went viral. The success led to a backlash, and now the organization must redefine its mission and its future.
June 14, 2014
A top Shiite cleric called on his followers to help fight Sunni insurgents. On Saturday, young Iraqis filled volunteer centers in Baghdad.
June 14, 2014
Thousands of civil rights activists descended upon Mississippi in 1964 to help register African-American voters. For many, the first stop was intensive training — including how to take a beating.
June 14, 2014
There are as many opinions on what's "appropriate" as there are threads hanging from those forbidden cutoffs.
June 14, 2014
The conflict in Iraq is rooted in long-running ethnic and religious divisions. Middle East analyst Phebe Marr tells Scott Simon why political reconciliation appears nearly impossible.
June 14, 2014
President Obama visited the Standing Rock Sioux Reservation in North Dakota. NPR's Scott Simon talks to Scott Davis, director of the North Dakota Indian Affairs Commission, about his visit.
June 14, 2014
On Tuesday, House Majority Leader Eric Cantor suffered a huge primary loss to a Tea Party candidate. NPR's Scott Simon talks to NPR political editor Ron Elving about the week in politics.
June 14, 2014
The medical team helping Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl reintegrate into the Army says he is learning to make all the daily decisions he was denied during his imprisonment by the Taliban.
June 14, 2014
Retired New York Judge Frank Barbaro says he wrongly convicted a white man for a 1999 murder of a black man. He explains to NPR's Scott Simon why he now wants the conviction thrown out.
June 14, 2014
After Iraqi troops fled, Kurdish forces moved in to northern Iraq. NPR's Scott Simon asks the region's foreign minister, Falah Mustafah Baktir, if this is a push for an independent Kurdish state.
June 14, 2014
President Obama ruled out sending in U.S. ground forces to Iraq, but vows to take action. NPR's Scott Simon talks to reporter Jane Arraf as Islamic fighters push closer to the Baghdad.
June 14, 2014
Separatists shot down a military transport plane, killing 49 people. This marks the deadliest day in the conflict between Ukraine and pro-Russian rebels.
June 14, 2014
The largest and oldest house on San Francisco's oft-photographed "Postcard Row" had languished on the market since March.
June 14, 2014
The American desert was once filled with hidden treasures — Native American baskets, pots — but no longer. They've been looted. Now, a reverse burglary. Time to return the loot.
June 14, 2014
In this week's roundup, a federal court says warrantless cellphone tracking is unconstitutional and we look back on a weeklong series exploring just how much of our digital data is exposed.
June 14, 2014
Connecticut abolished capital punishment in 2012. But in May, a Connecticut judge sentenced Richard Roszkowski to death for three murders. The answer to the apparent contradiction is in the dates.
June 14, 2014
Afghans are choosing between two former government ministers in a presidential election that will be the first transfer of power by ballot in Afghanistan's history.
June 14, 2014
In a sea of national colors, one American soccer fan dons the red-and-white of the U.S. team. Even the youngest locals seem unimpressed.
June 13, 2014

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