NPR News

The foreign ministers of South Korea and Japan achieved an agreement meant to resolve a decades-long impasse over Korean women forced into Japanese military-run brothels during World War II.
Dec. 28, 2015
For the first time in decades, the number of children with asthma isn't increasing, federal scientists report. But cases continue to rise among African-American children and poor children.
Dec. 28, 2015
Wexler, one of Hollywood's most famous and honored cinematographers and one whose innovative approach helped him win Oscars for Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf? and Bound for Glory, died Sunday.
Dec. 28, 2015
Kelly was recognized as one of the greatest American artists of the 20th century. He died Sunday afternoon, leaving behind pieces in nearly every major museum of modern art.
Dec. 27, 2015
Thousands of Cubans have been stuck in Costa Rica as they attempt to make their way to the United States.
Dec. 27, 2015
Compared with the Great Recession years, 2015 was a fairly tame time. Still, at least five stories had major impacts. They involved everything from crashing oil prices to merging beer companies.
Dec. 27, 2015
The swimmer — who holds 18 Olympic gold medals — intends to join ASU's coaching staff after next summer's Rio Olympics.
Dec. 27, 2015
Robert Spitzer helped create the first set of rigorous standards to identify mental disorders.
Dec. 27, 2015
At least ten people were killed and thousands of people were left without power after severe weather passed through the Dallas area on Saturday night.
Dec. 27, 2015
A new study in the journal JAMA Pediatrics says electronic toys for infants that produce lights and words were associated with decreased quantity and quality of language when compared to wooden toys.
Dec. 27, 2015
Mexican chef Pati Jinich shows NPR's Carrie Kahn how to handle those Christmas dinner turkey leftovers. She shows us how to make a mouthwatering pibil sauce for next-day sandwiches and enchiladas.
Dec. 27, 2015
Alabama is not a state that generally has prominence in presidential primaries. But Alabama's secretary of state is on a mission to change that in 2016, and he's having success luring GOP contenders.
Dec. 27, 2015
Eight-year suspensions were given last week for FIFA's top bosses, Sepp Blatter and Michel Platini. Carrie Kahn talks with author David Henry Sterry about the latest on FIFA's scandal plagued year.
Dec. 27, 2015
Mayor Bill de Blasio created a program for the New York to get people out of shelters quickly. But after looking for an apartment for months, one single mother finds landlords are not willing to accept the voucher.
Dec. 27, 2015
2015 was a pivotal year for black Americans and civic activism. Gene Demby of NPR's Code Switch talks through some of the year's major stories with NPR's Carrie Kahn.
Dec. 27, 2015
Last week, Weekend Edition issued a PSA to prevent holiday injuries. But we failed to note that you should never, ever stick your hand in a snowblower — even if it's off. Carrie Kahn has a correction.
Dec. 27, 2015
Minorities are historically underrepresented in science, technology, engineering and math fields. John Dimandja is a Congolese chemist on the faculty of Spelman College who's pointing the way into STEM careers for students of color.
Dec. 27, 2015
Carrie Kahn talks to John Burnett about the recent surge of undocumented minors from Central America to Texas. We also hear from a 17-year-old who recently made the trek a second time, and successfully crossed the border.
Dec. 27, 2015
In 2015, a huge wave of humanity fled war, persecution and hunger - and headed for Europe. Reporter Joanna Kakissis talks with host Carrie Kahn about the greatest migration the continent has seen since World War II.
Dec. 27, 2015
Restrictions may be falling away, but there are no signs yet that commerce between the countries is about to take off. U.S. agriculture sales to Cuba are actually down, while American tourism is up.
Dec. 27, 2015

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