NPR News

Corporations in Atlanta have a long history of supporting a focus on business, not social conservatives' issues. Now the governor is vetoing a bill that LGBT groups say would lead to discrimination.
March 29, 2016
In March 1867, the U.S. purchased Alaska. This igloo-shaped, torched-meringue dessert came as a fringe benefit. Was it a sweet flash of genius, political satire — or maybe a bit of both?
March 29, 2016
Teachers explain how they're applying the social media app to lessons and homework.
March 29, 2016
The plane was diverted while flying from the Egyptian Mediterranean coastal city of Alexandria to the capital, Cairo, and later landed in Cyprus where some women and children were allowed to deboard.
March 29, 2016
The Justice Department has asked a federal court to vacate its order that Apple write software to help the FBI access data in the San Bernardino shooter's iPhone.
March 28, 2016
The 23-year-old founder says sci-fi writers love to use virtual reality as a backdrop for conflict, but the future is "probably not going to be nearly as interesting."
March 28, 2016
The Justice Department says it is withdrawing its legal action against Apple, because it has been able to get data from a terrorist's phone. A spokeswoman says the FBI is reviewing the data.
March 28, 2016
The hashtag trended for hours Sunday. It was led by people of color who support the Vermont senator's presidential bid.
March 28, 2016
In federal court in New York City, Rafael Callejas admitted to taking bribes over lucrative broadcast rights. He was head of the Honduran soccer federation from 2002 to 2015.
March 28, 2016
NPR's congressional correspondent Ailsa Chang explains what happened Monday at the Capitol complex, where a man with a weapon entered the Visitor Center and was shot by Capitol police.
March 28, 2016
Two academics suggest that loans financed by the private sector could be one way to help patients to cover the cost of expensive, curative pharmaceuticals. Think mortgages.
March 28, 2016
Belgian playwright Ismael Saidi is taking his anti-radicalization message to schools in heavily Muslim neighborhoods. He finds extremism still has appeal, even after last week's terror attacks.
March 28, 2016
Belgium is divided linguistically, culturally and politically. Yet the Brussels bombings have also brought citizens together in ways they hadn't expected.
March 28, 2016
The federal lawsuit filed by multiple plaintiffs argues that the law, signed by Gov. Pat McCrory last week, is causing harm to the state's LGBT community.
March 28, 2016
The U.S. Capitol went on lockdown after reports of shots fired. Paul Singer, Washington correspondent for USA Today, was having coffee in the cafe at the time. He describes what happened next.
March 28, 2016
With Wal-Mart now selling organic food, and Whole Foods testing cheaper stores, it's easy to think organic has gone mainstream. But one study finds organics are still far more common in richer areas.
March 28, 2016
Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel is announcing his pick for the city's police chief, Eddie Johnson. While some are praising the choice, others wonder if the department insider can make significant changes.
March 28, 2016
A city in California adopted an innovative program to stop violence: By offering potential criminals support services and cash for good behavior. Since then, the murder rate has dramatically declined.
March 28, 2016
In the wake of the suicide bombing in Lahore, Pakistanis are struggling to come to terms with the violence. The blast in a park killed more than 70 people and wounded more than 300 others.
March 28, 2016
The Capitol was briefly placed on lockdown amid reports that shots had been fired at the visitor's center. Multiple news reports said a police officer had been wounded, but that hasn't been confirmed.
March 28, 2016

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