NPR News

If the Colorado newspaper files a lawsuit, legal experts said it would be the first of its kind, potentially setting a legal definition for what is considered fake news and what is not.
Feb. 17, 2017
"The law mentions one blow, but with one blow you can kill someone," says a young mom hiding in a shelter. "What kind of husbands, what kind of families, will we have with that law? Is that normal?"
Feb. 17, 2017
President Trump's visit to the North Charleston plant comes after the company's employees voted against unionizing.
Feb. 17, 2017
A lobbying battle is being waged over a rule requiring financial advisers to act in their clients' best interest in retirement planning. It pits financial firms against consumer and retiree groups.
Feb. 17, 2017
The doll Cayla looks like an everyday toy and gives no notice that it collects and transmits everything it hears, German regulators say.
Feb. 17, 2017
A federal appeals court ruled that part of the state's "Docs vs. Glocks" law limiting what doctors can ask patients about guns in the home violates the First Amendment right to free speech.
Feb. 17, 2017
Jay Y. Lee, vice president of Samsung, has been taken in on charges of bribery and embezzlement. He's been a central figure in a corruption scandal that brought President Park Geun-hye's impeachment.
Feb. 17, 2017
Infanta Cristina de Borbón and her husband were accused of embezzling millions of dollars in public donations to a sports charity.
Feb. 17, 2017
Princess Infanta Cristina de Borbón, 50, had also faced charges of tax fraud; although she was acquitted, a court ordered her to pay a fine of 265,000 euros (around $280,000).
Feb. 17, 2017
Since December, there have been more than 1,000 suspected human cases of yellow fever and hundreds more probable cases in monkeys.
Feb. 17, 2017
A 29-year-old man is arrested in Myrtle Beach, S.C., accused of buying a gun and ammunition as part of a plan to carry out a white supremacist attack.
Feb. 17, 2017
Discussions of a border wall happen at the intersection of environmental and civil rights.
Feb. 17, 2017
Because of unstable milk prices, small-diary owners are also selling artisanal cheeses to help them stay afloat. The idea is catching on — in Iowa, the number of on-farm cheesemakers has doubled.
Feb. 17, 2017
Democrats say the anger at recent GOP town halls reminds them of the same backlash they faced eight years ago with the rise of the Tea Party. Now, Democrats are using that as a blueprint.
Feb. 17, 2017
The true health of politicians has likely been cloaked in secrecy since the days of Mesopotamian kings, but definitely since the Wilson administration. Has the time come to test presidents' cognition?
Feb. 17, 2017
This weekend marks the 75th anniversary of Franklin Roosevelt's executive order that led to the internment of Japanese-Americans. We hear from two people who were interned when they were children.
Feb. 17, 2017
How the border wall might keep undocumented migrants in the country, a study measures the effects of voter ID laws on minority turnout, and Bey's Grammy snubs illustrates about race and merit.
Feb. 17, 2017
Here's a roundup of how Trump's new leadership could affect education.
Feb. 17, 2017
A rural road in northern New York has become a magnet for refugees who no longer want to stay in the U.S. Growing numbers are stepping into Canada, knowing Mounties immediately will arrest them.
Feb. 17, 2017
Donald Trump and his team have committed to certain steps that touch on ethics and conflicts-of-interest concerns. We offer context and look for evidence to track progress of those promises.
Feb. 17, 2017

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