NPR News

The Huffington Post's Ryan Grim, Politico's Susan Glasser, NPR's Mike Oreskes and David Brody of the Christian Broadcasting Network talk about accusations of media bias and how media cover politics.
July 31, 2016
None of the six officers facing charges in Freddie Gray's death were convicted. Law professor David Jaros talks about what happened and why police officer convictions are uncommon.
July 31, 2016
Hillary Clinton and Tim Kaine are campaigning in Pennsylvania and Ohio, talking about the economy. But Donald Trump and the Khan family have dominated the media over the weekend.
July 31, 2016
While in Philadelphia for the DNC, Michel Martin visited a South Philly institution to taste a Philly classic: water ice (also called Italian ice). John's Water Ice has been open since 1945.
July 31, 2016
A federal appeals court struck down North Carolina's voter ID law. Law professor Rick Hasen explains why and what impact it will have.
July 31, 2016
We take proactive measures to stop the spread of the flu — so, NPR's Michel Martin asks, why can't we combat gun violence the same way?
July 31, 2016
First, the Australian team's move-in was delayed. Then they had to evacuate because of a fire in their building. Now their delegation head says several items were stolen after they fled from the fire.
July 31, 2016
Two issues dominated the Sunday political talk shows: how Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton have responded to grieving families, and what role Russia is playing in the campaign.
July 31, 2016
"Being united is a response to this act of horror and barbarism," said one Muslim leader. Many Muslims across France were sending a message of unity after two extremist teens brutally killed a priest.
July 31, 2016
After more than a week, a 38,000-acre wildfire on the California coast is still growing, and authorities warn it could burn through August even after it is contained.
July 31, 2016
Japanese voters have elected Yuriko Koike as the capital's first female governor. She's taking the helm amid high-pressure preparations for the 2020 Summer Olympics in Tokyo.
July 31, 2016
Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan has launched a shakeup of the country's armed forces and dismissed nearly 1,400 more military personnel, in the wake of a failed coup attempt earlier this month.
July 31, 2016
For many National Park Service employees, the pay is seasonal and not great. The hours can be long and tedious. But for many, there's a big payoff in dedicating their days to nature.
July 31, 2016
Rob Townsend went from a successful Americana band in Texas to New York City, where he came out and is now writing music for the LGBT community. NPR's Elise Hu talks to him about his journey.
July 31, 2016
Native American languages are struggling to stay alive. But with the help of summer language institutes, they are on their way back.
July 31, 2016
Gina Worthen, Travis Rechenbach and Alicia Jessop have not made up their minds about who they are voting for. NPR's Elise Hu asks them whether the conventions have helped them come to a decision.
July 31, 2016
Oyster farming on the East Coast has doubled in the past six years and shows no sign of slowing. Not only is this good for consumers and fishermen. Apparently it's good for our waterways.
July 31, 2016
Do we really know those we're closest to? The riveting book "You Will Know Me," set in the world of competitive gymnastics, suggests not. NPR's Elise Hu speaks with author Megan Abbott.
July 31, 2016
The latest book in J.K. Rowling's series, really a script for a play, "Harry Potter and the Cursed Child," went on sale at midnight. We check in with fans who lined up, wands in hand, to get a copy.
July 31, 2016
Stella Santana, the daughter of Carlos Santana, has played music for years but is only now coming out with her own debut album. NPR's Elise Hu speaks with her about the album, "Selfish."
July 31, 2016

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