NPR News

Scouting has been the official program for Mormon boys for more than 100 years, but that may change after a vote allowing openly gay leaders. A Brigham Young professor says a split would be wrenching.
Aug. 2, 2015
The Syrian insurgent group affiliated with al-Qaeda has attacked U.S.-backed Syrian fighters. NPR's Rachel Martin gets the details from Anne Barnard of the New York Times.
Aug. 2, 2015
Drug users are testing opioids that are less prone to abuse than current drugs. David Crow of the Financial Times tells NPR's Rachel Martin the drugs could also boost profits for pharmaceutical firms.
Aug. 2, 2015
Host Rachel Martin speaks with William Pierce, executive director of the the Draft Biden PAC, about reports that the vice president is mulling a 2016 run.
Aug. 2, 2015
Will the NFL's first female coach be a "distraction" for the Arizona Cardinals or merely a distraction for the media? NPR's Rachel Martin talks sensationalism in sports with Slate's Mike Pesca.
Aug. 2, 2015
'Waterweavers' shows how rivers, fibers and recycled plastic bottles are all part of the culture of the country.
Aug. 2, 2015
A classic French dish, confit de canard was originally a way to preserve meat, and traditional recipes can require dozens of steps to prepare. David Lebovitz's fake take cuts the steps down to five.
Aug. 2, 2015
State attorney General Ken Paxton was indicted on three counts of securities fraud, according to the Times, and is expected to turn himself in to authorities on Monday.
Aug. 1, 2015
A Palestinian baby was killed Friday in an arson attack in the West Bank. Jewish settlers are suspected in the attack, which Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu has called "an act of terrorism."
Aug. 1, 2015
SuperPACs released their latest funding numbers Friday, and already it's clear that the committees' roles in 2016 will be gargantuan.
Aug. 1, 2015
Citing "huge disgust and sadness," a conservation group said the lion nicknamed Jericho had been killed Saturday. But a researcher in Zimbabwe says he doesn't believe it.
Aug. 1, 2015
Nine of the largest fires cover areas of at least 1,000 acres each; a firefighter from Rapid City, S.D., was killed while battling one large blaze in Northern California.
Aug. 1, 2015
Doctors say the fall has left Kira Grunberg, 21, a paraplegic — a development that shocked the sports world in Europe and brought offers of emotional and financial support.
Aug. 1, 2015
The International Sailing Federation says the move is prompted by concerns over athletes' health and safety, after reports of raw sewage and trash in the water around Rio.
Aug. 1, 2015
After the large piece of debris was discovered on the French island of Reunion in the Indian Ocean this week, Malaysia Airlines said it "is almost certainly part of a Boeing 777."
Aug. 1, 2015
Germany has struggled with a record number of refugees, prompting calls for increased deportations. But German businesses see an opportunity in these newcomers to ease a shortage of skilled workers.
Aug. 1, 2015
A 2001 agreement between Cincinnati police, the police union and community groups is credited with keeping protests peaceful there after the killing of an unarmed black motorist by a police officer.
Aug. 1, 2015
The dispute follows Russia's invasion of Ukraine. The 1.6 billion euro helicopter carriers are sitting in French dockyards.
Aug. 1, 2015
White farmers were driven out of Zimbabwe 15 years ago. Now the government says some white farmers could get their land back. NPR's Scott Simon speaks with Zimbabwean journalist Peta Thornycroft.
Aug. 1, 2015
Hillary Clinton released her medical report, her tax returns, and a cache of unseen emails on Friday. NPR's Scott Simon talks politics with senior editor Ron Elving.
Aug. 1, 2015

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