NPR News

A poll shows that Americans have no clue about the percent of the budget pie that is directed to foreign aid. But maybe it's not our fault.
February 10, 2015
Strawberry farmers have dropped a lawsuit against the University of California, Davis, and the university has hired a new strawberry breeder. But the future of academic berry breeding is uncertain.
February 10, 2015
Robert Siegel speaks to Emory University epidemiologist Dr. Saad Omer about his research into state laws covering non-medical vaccine exemptions.
February 10, 2015
Russia's seizure of Crimea has been widely criticized. But what if Crimea was given away illegally to Ukraine back in 1954? Russian lawmakers are hard at work on their own version of history.
February 10, 2015
With gas prices down, a growing number of states are turning to a gas tax increase. New Jersey looks at following suit to fund much-needed projects, but some drivers aren't eager to pay up.
February 10, 2015
Despite an uneasy relationship to the health law, insurance brokers are touting their expertise and helping Texans sign up for Affordable Care Act insurance.
February 10, 2015
A record number of Americans are studying abroad. Educators say that's good, as it promotes better cross-cultural understanding. But many in the field worry the influx of technology and social media may be hampering students' ability to fully immerse themselves abroad.
February 10, 2015
The family of Kayla Mueller released a statement on Tuesday confirming her death while being held hostage by ISIS militants. Mueller's death raises questions about whether U.S. policies made it more difficult to save her.
February 10, 2015
Restaurants are using disposable cutlery and plates. Residents only have water for a few hours. Food prices are soaring. Now, Sao Paulo faces draconian rationing of up to five days a week.
February 10, 2015
Six years ago, 11,000 untested rape kits were found in Detroit. Now nearly all of the kits have been tested, but it will cost the city millions to investigate and prosecute every case.
February 10, 2015
Mary Harris found out she was pregnant the day before she had scheduled surgery for breast cancer. It turns out there is limited data on how chemotherapy during pregnancy affects a baby.
February 10, 2015
The Obama administration is creating a new agency to gather and distribute intelligence on cyber threats more quickly. The agency is modeled after the National Counter Terrorism Center, created after Sept. 11 to improve information sharing across the U.S. government.
February 10, 2015
Illinois' new Republican governor is taking a page in politics from other Midwestern states. Bruce Rauner is setting policies that have government labor unions bristling and he hasn't even been on the job for a month.
February 10, 2015
Russian President Vladimir Putin brought a present to Cairo for the Egyptian president — a Kalashnikov rifle. The two leaders also signed a deal for a Russian nuclear plant.
February 10, 2015
Margaret Bentley, a woman in British Columbia, didn't want food or liquids if she became mentally disabled. But a nursing home is refusing to stop feeding her, even though she has Alzheimer's.
February 10, 2015
In a new book, David Axelrod, a political strategist who helped Obama triumph in two presidential campaigns, said Obama opposed gay marriage for political expediency.
February 10, 2015
The former Florida governor isn't technically a presidential candidate yet. But he released the first chapter of an e-book based on hundreds of thousands of emails he sent and received as governor.
February 10, 2015
There's an outbreak of bone broth fever in the U.S., with proponents raving about its nourishing and healing properties. But there isn't much in the way of science to back up some of the claims.
February 10, 2015
The Israeli prime minister said his country had a "profound disagreement" with the White House on nuclear talks with Iran, and it was his duty to speak up on an issue that affects Israel's survival.
February 10, 2015
California lets kindergartners start school as long as they've had the first dose of all required vaccines. But some schools aren't tracking whether such kids end up getting all the doses they need.
February 10, 2015

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