NPR News

A federal judge in Louisiana has ruled that Black Lives Matter is not a person, not a company and not a formal entity. And that means the social movement can't be sued.
Sept. 30, 2017
NPR's Michel Martin discusses efforts to get power up and running on the island after Hurricane Maria, with Devon Streit, a deputy assistant secretary at the Department of Energy.
Sept. 30, 2017
President Trump tweeted criticism of the mayor of San Juan, who has been critical of the federal government's response to the disaster since Hurricane Maria hit the island more than 10 days ago.
Sept. 30, 2017
The goal is "to avoid the promotion of inaccessible beauty ideals and prevent anorexia among young people," said France's former health minister.
Sept. 30, 2017
"We have lines of communications to Pyongyang," said Secretary of State Rex Tillerson Saturday from Beijing as he called for a cooling of an "overheated" situation.
Sept. 30, 2017
Plus two new studies on school choice and kindergarten readiness in our weekly roundup of education news.
Sept. 30, 2017
Kelly's first week as host of NBC's 9 a.m. Today show was rocky. The former Fox News anchor has time to steady the ship, but the transformation she's seeking to make is a big one.
Sept. 30, 2017
Department of Homeland Security says it's actually been collecting social media data on immigrants for years.
Sept. 30, 2017
Lawmakers want the names of any White House aides using private email accounts for official business. A law professor said using private email is "not a criminal offense. It's just very, very stupid."
Sept. 30, 2017
Former Trump strategist Steve Bannon and allies are enthused after a Roy Moore victory over Mitch McConnell's chosen candidate, and they have incumbents in Nevada, Arizona and more in their sights.
Sept. 30, 2017
Iguanas lost their habitat because of Hurricane Irma. That could mean disease-carrying mosquitoes, which are food for the lizards, could multiply faster.
Sept. 30, 2017
"You must leave now," thousands of Americans from Puerto Rico to Oregon to Florida, Montana, Texas and beyond were told, as floods, fire and wind threatened their lives. Some said no.
Sept. 30, 2017
The people of Massachusetts celebrated the centennial in sticky style with a festival — including thousands of Fluffernutter sandwiches — in the neighborhood where Fluff was first whipped up.
Sept. 30, 2017
Hugh Hefner died this week at the age of 91. NPR's Scott Simon says Hefner "made history, and then tripped over it."
Sept. 30, 2017
Republican Gov. Sam Brownback said the 2012 tax cuts would deliver a "shot of adrenaline" to the state's economy. Instead, revenues crashed, spending cuts, borrowing and accounting tricks followed.
Sept. 30, 2017
Most years, spiny lobsters are the most lucrative commercial catch in Florida. Hurricane Irma cut this season short. Some fishermen are hoping a strong stone crab season will keep the industry afloat.
Sept. 30, 2017
After the DHS chief says the recovery effort in Puerto Rico is working, the mayor of San Juan explodes in frustration, asking, "Where is the good news?"
Sept. 29, 2017
NPR's Kelly McEvers talks with Politico's Dan Diamond, who broke much of the news about Health and Human Services Secretary Tom Price's charter flights, about Price's resignation.
Sept. 29, 2017
Under federal and state law, teachers and students do not lose their First Amendment rights when they enter school property. But that hasn't stopped some schools from threatening to punish them.
Sept. 29, 2017
The Spanish government has stepped up efforts to prevent the Catalan independence referendum, with police seizing millions of ballots, and trying to seal-off schools where Sunday's voting is planned.
Sept. 29, 2017

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