NPR News

Haiti boasts of having 5.8 million registered voters. Many poll watchers expect a December runoff will be necessary because there are a whopping 54 candidates vying to become the next president.
Oct. 25, 2015
There have been more than 50 school shootings this year. Two people who train teachers to reach out to children at risk for committing violence share what's worked and what precautions they've taken.
Oct. 25, 2015
Few successful recent nominees have announced their candidacy as recently as Biden could have this week.
Oct. 25, 2015
The Unicode Consortium decides which emojis live or die. As they prepare to release the next batch of emojis, we ask the emoji gatekeeper's president about the approval process.
Oct. 25, 2015
Our story on the struggles of first-year teachers caught the attention of a lot of people. Teachers shared advice, personal experiences and encouragement.
Oct. 25, 2015
Is the drama over the House Speakership over now that Paul Ryan appears to have widespread support? NPR's Rachel Martin speaks to Reihan Salam of National Review about whether Ryan can rule.
Oct. 25, 2015
The Obama Administration has a plan to limit the number of standardized tests that children take. NPR's Rachel Martin speaks to correspondent Anya Kamenetz about what changes the efforts might bring.
Oct. 25, 2015
A three-week gathering of Catholic prelates from around the globe ends after what many say was the most contentious gathering of archbishops in decades.
Oct. 25, 2015
After restaurateur Danny Meyer said he's phasing out tipping at his establishments, others are asking: Is it time to get rid of tipping? One food writer weighs in.
Oct. 25, 2015
Korean Americans are not allowed to partake in the North-South Korean reunions. NPR's Rachel Martin talks to Chahee Stanfield of the National Coalition for the Divided Families about their options.
Oct. 25, 2015
Canada's new Liberal government is expected to chart a different foreign policy course. NPR's Rachel Martin asks Colin Robertson of the Canadian Global Affairs Institute what this means for the U.S.
Oct. 25, 2015
Despite the trade embargo, Cubans have long enjoyed pirated television programs. The Washington Post's Nick Miroff speaks to NPR's Rachel Martin about the black market's future when trade is normalized.
Oct. 25, 2015
Hurricane Patricia weakened into a tropical depression when it made landfall in Jalisco state, Mexico. There is widespread relief. Now begins the clean up from the rains and floods Patricia triggered.
Oct. 25, 2015
Iowa's Democratic Party's Jefferson Jackson Dinner can be a game changer. NPR's Rachel Martin speaks with national political correspondent Mara Liasson about how the presidential hopefuls faired.
Oct. 25, 2015
The volunteers, who have come from as far away as Australia, have set up a makeshift kitchen, where they cook thousands of hot meals and shuttle them to refugee camps.
Oct. 25, 2015
Infection and autoimmune activity result in inflammation. And many psychiatric researchers think inflammation may play a role in depression and other mental illnesses.
Oct. 25, 2015
It's a tough life for many of the Syrian kids who are now refugees in Lebanon: working in the fields up to 14 hours a day instead of going to school.
Oct. 25, 2015
Medical school applications have gone way up in the past few decades. But one group of applicants has not grown: black men.
Oct. 24, 2015
Secretary of State John Kerry has helped forge an agreement between Israel and Jordan, in an effort to defuse violence between Israelis and Palestinians over the past few weeks.
Oct. 24, 2015
The Democrats running for president are in Des Moines, Iowa, Saturday night for the annual Jefferson Jackson Dinner, one of the marquee events leading up to January's Iowa caucus.
Oct. 24, 2015

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