NPR News

Engineers at MIT developed an electric, shareable car that would fold to conserve parking spaces. A prototype was made for production in Europe. But why did this promising auto never hit the road?
Nov. 5, 2015
A genetic engineering technique raises hopes for eliminating diseases, such as malaria. But it is also sparking fears of unintended consequences if delicately balanced ecosystems are disrupted.
Nov. 5, 2015
A summit between leaders of China and Taiwan this Saturday will be the first in more than 60 years. It complicates Taiwan's already high-stakes presidential race.
Nov. 5, 2015
Sanders concedes that he trails Hillary Clinton for the Democratic nomination, but also notes that some polls show him doing better than Clinton in match-ups against the Republicans.
Nov. 5, 2015
Specialized health insurance marketplaces that cater to businesses with fewer than 50 employees haven't gotten much traction. Cheaper alternatives are one reason why.
Nov. 5, 2015
Sanders concedes that he trails Hillary Clinton for the Democratic nomination, but also notes that some polls show him doing better than Clinton in match-ups against the Republicans.
Nov. 5, 2015
This is the time of year subsistence farmers clear land by setting fires in the Amazon. They say it's the only way they can make a living, but it's delivering another blow to the rain forest.
Nov. 5, 2015
Mathison's last project was another collaboration with Steven Spielberg, an adaptation of Roald Dahl's The BFG, scheduled for release in 2016.
Nov. 5, 2015
Police arrested a man who allegedly stabbed Stone, causing serious wounds, in early October. Stone is one of three Americans who thwarted a terrorist attack on a Paris-bound train this summer.
Nov. 4, 2015
A California law will soon require pregnancy centers that oppose abortion to provide notice to their clients of the availability of abortion services in the state. Clinics are crying foul — and suing.
Nov. 4, 2015
Critics blasted the Marine Corps for not publishing its full study on how gender integration affected combat readiness. NPR obtained the 978-page report.
Nov. 4, 2015
He came into the hospital in bad shape. In addition to being HIV-positive, he had what looked like a malignant tumor. The tumor, it turned out, was not human.
Nov. 4, 2015
In a decision that could open the door to legalizing marijuana in Mexico, that country's supreme court said Wednesday that four plaintiffs should be allowed to grow marijuana for their own use.
Nov. 4, 2015
Instant noodles are a staple for inmates: a basis of recipe hacks, a form of currency. They've even helped defuse a prison riot, as an ex-inmate details in Prison Ramen, a book of stories and recipes.
Nov. 4, 2015
The head of a credit scoring firm says Facebook posts can offer an insight into creditworthiness. If your online presence becomes a financial health gauge, there are legal protections to know about.
Nov. 4, 2015
The director's recent comments, in which he described police shootings as "murder," have drawn calls for boycotting his films. They also reveal a bitter fault line in 2016: Who supports the police?
Nov. 4, 2015
"The little that we had is gone": Immigration status can compound the loss families face after devastating wildfires.
Nov. 4, 2015
Brain cells that track our location also can track time and distance, a study finds. This could explain how the brain uses place and time to organize memories throughout our lives.
Nov. 4, 2015
Physicists don't know why there's more matter than antimatter in our universe. New research smashed together atoms of pure gold to look for clues.
Nov. 4, 2015
Acting Drug Enforcement Administration Chief Chuck Rosenberg added a new voice to the debate over public scrutiny of law enforcement Wednesday.
Nov. 4, 2015

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