NPR News

The Obama administration on Monday will roll out a plan to cut earth-warming pollution from power plants by 30 percent by 2030. The proposal was first reported Sunday by The Wall Street Journal.
June 01, 2014
Yuri Kochiyama spent two years in an internment camp and helped win reparations for Japanese-Americans. A lifelong champion of civil rights, she had a brief but formative friendship with Malcolm X.
June 01, 2014
In places where bullets fly regularly, there's a new kind of "duck and cover" lesson for kids. The impact of stray bullets isn't widely studied, but their indiscriminate nature is known all too well.
June 01, 2014
Documents leaked by Edward Snowden show the NSA is scouring emails, text messages, social media, videoconferences and other sources looking for facial-recognition quality photographs.
June 01, 2014
Following a European court ruling, the search engine is taking requests to delete personal information. At one point on Friday, Google was getting more than 20 requests a minute.
June 01, 2014
A major hurricane has not made landfall in the United States in for 3,142 days. That's the longest streak going back to 1900.
June 01, 2014
President Bashar Assad is sure to win in Tuesday's election. Some opponents are boycotting the vote, airing frustrations through bleak satire. There are signs that others will use violence in protest.
June 01, 2014
The Atlantic City-bound private jet crashed shortly after it took off from a Massachusetts airfield on Saturday.
June 01, 2014
Secretary of Defense Chuck Hagel said officials believed Bowe Bergdahl's life was in danger, so the administration had to act quickly. Bergdahl was released after almost five years in captivity.
June 01, 2014
Science is always churning out weird, funny and fascinating findings. What did we miss this week? NPR's Rachel Martin checks in with science writer Rose Eveleth.
June 01, 2014
A U.S. citizen who blew himself up in a suicide attack in Syria last week grew up in Florida, according to U.S. officials. NPR's Rachel Martin talks to former FBI Intelligence adviser Philip Mudd.
June 01, 2014
President Obama plans to announce Monday his most ambitious plan yet to combat climate change. NPR's Rachel Martin talks to Princeton professor Michael Oppenheimer about the significance of the plan.
June 01, 2014
President Obama observes two big anniversaries in Europe this week. But NPR's Scott Horsley tells NPR's Rachel Martin that this trip is more about the future of the continent than the past.
June 01, 2014
In France, the far right's victory in last week's election was one more crisis for President Francois Hollande. Even before the vote, he was rated the most unpopular French president in 50 years.
June 01, 2014
Last week, the New Orleans school district became the first all-charter district in the country. NPR's Rachel Martin talks to Sarah Carr, a reporter who's been following the city's changing schools.
June 01, 2014
Stefanie O'Neill has been leading a campaign called "Bring Bowe Back" for the past few years. NPR's Rachel Martin talks to O'Neill about the hometown reaction to POW Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl's release.
June 01, 2014
NPR's Rachel Martin talks to NPR's Sean Carberry in Afghanistan about the latest on the release of POW Army Sgt. Bowe Bergdahl.
June 01, 2014
Students were the driving force behind the 1989 pro-democracy protests in Beijing. China's youth now have other worries, the events of 25 years ago forgotten and buried by time and the government.
June 01, 2014
The annual meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology features thousands of presentations but no big news. That's how cancer treatment improves, in small increments.
June 01, 2014
The knish is a classic Jewish comfort food — a pillow of dough filled with savory fillings like mashed potatoes. Author Laura Silver says that the New York knish is also filled with stories.
June 01, 2014

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