NPR News

A top civil rights lawyer for the Justice Department in the turbulent 1960s, John Doar made his mark fighting racial discrimination.
November 11, 2014
The jury could hand down its decision in the teen's death as early as this weekend, and both protesters and authorities are preparing for that moment.
November 11, 2014
A day meant to celebrate being single has turned in to the world's largest shopping event. But it's unlikely to catch on in the U.S.
November 11, 2014
The prosthetics industry is rapidly growing, allowing patients to better customize their devices and even regain a sense of touch.
November 11, 2014
More than 1 million public school students in the U.S. don't have permanent homes. Most live doubled up with family or friends, but many live in motels, emergency shelters, campgrounds — even cars.
November 11, 2014
To qualify for coverage, patients would have to first meet with a doctor to talk through the pros and cons of scans, which involve a low-dose of radiation.
November 11, 2014
Those who use two of the world's most popular websites can easily donate to charities working to stem Ebola's spread in West Africa. The money will help, but aid groups say awareness is important too.
November 11, 2014
The federal government is shutting down cod fishing in the Gulf of Maine for the next six months. But fishermen, who now face an uncertain future, dispute the government's cod counts.
November 11, 2014
When Jennifer Hopper's husband was hit in the eye with a baseball, she rushed him to a hospital she knew was within their insurance plan. Then the ER doctor sent her an extra bill for more than $700.
November 11, 2014
The Church of Latter-day Saints never denied polygamy was part of its history. But in a series of new essays, it describes the now-banned practice in detail.
November 11, 2014
A British Army private died of dysentery 99 years ago. A sample of the bug that killed him may help researchers develop a vaccine for this antibiotic-resistant disease, a top killer of young kids.
November 11, 2014
Journalist David Wood says "almost everyone" in war has suffered a violation of their sense of right and wrong. As a result, Wood tells Fresh Air, veterans deal with grief, numbness or guilt.
November 11, 2014
The Common Core State Standards have led to big changes in the way many teachers approach reading instruction.
November 11, 2014
Researchers admit their estimates that the comet was "potato-shaped" were way off. Luck may now be the deciding factor in the attempt for a soft landing early Wednesday.
November 11, 2014
Alaska's wrestling tournament for small schools will be held next month — but not at Anchorage Christian Schools. A complaint about an introductory prayer led to a request to stop the practice.
November 11, 2014
From videos to Internet magazines, the extremist group has successfully recruited around the world. One of their recent claims: enslaving women as a prize of war is sanctioned by the Quran.
November 11, 2014
Other countries have moved away from child labor, but not Bolivia, which has lowered the legal working age to as young as 10. Advocates say the move brings the law in line with harsh reality.
November 11, 2014
The number of Americans struggling to afford food has remained stuck near recession-era highs. But a recent Gallup poll suggests things may be starting to get back on track for some.
November 11, 2014
A designer who has dyslexia has created a font to avoid confusion and add clarity. And two English researchers are making a dictionary that favors meaning over the alphabet.
November 11, 2014
The first of 888,246 ceramic poppies — one for each soldier from Britain and its colonies who died — was planted Aug. 5 at the Tower of London; the last today. The site has had 4 million visitors.
November 11, 2014

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