NPR News

Most of those still unaccounted for are firefighters who responded to last week's explosions, officials say.
Aug. 16, 2015
A British hospital will soon launch a clinical trial using dogs to detect prostate cancer. With their powerful noses, the dogs can sniff out cancer in as little as one-fifth of a teaspoon of urine.
Aug. 16, 2015
U.S. combat forces left last year and there have been a number of troubling signs this year. They include a rise in deadly attacks and renewed friction between Afghanistan and Pakistan.
Aug. 16, 2015
The activist, who helped found the Student Non-Violent Coordinating Committee, was a key figure in organizing sit-ins and freedom rides and the 1963 March on Washington.
Aug. 16, 2015
Through recipes and biographical vignettes, author Cara Nicoletti's new book brings literature to life. Nicoletti tells NPR's Rachel Martin that food has always been part of her reading.
Aug. 16, 2015
Fairgoers took in politics with their corndogs in Des Moines on Saturday as Hillary Clinton, Donald Trump and Bernie Sanders all campaigned with the crowds.
Aug. 16, 2015
This week, Amnesty International will recommend full decriminalization of the sex trade. Catherine Murphy, a policy adviser for the group, tells NPR's Rachel Martin it's facing a backlash.
Aug. 16, 2015
New York Times correspondent Andrew Kramer tells NPR's Rachel Martin why Russian authorities are burning hundreds of tons of food and how a nation that suffered wartime starvation is reacting.
Aug. 16, 2015
Two soldiers are poised to become the first women to pass Army Ranger training. NPR's Rachel Martin interviews Christian Science Monitor reporter Anna Mulrine, who witnessed their grueling tests.
Aug. 16, 2015
With Europe-bound migrants dying in the sea crossing, NPR's Rachel Martin hears about rescue operations from Lindis Hurum, emergency coordinator for Doctors Without Borders on the ship Bourbon Argos.
Aug. 16, 2015
Europe is dealing with its largest wave of displaced people since World War II — a quarter million migrants just this year. NPR's Rachel Martin gets the numbers from correspondent Ari Shapiro.
Aug. 16, 2015
Federal law requires insurance firms to cover treatment for addiction as they do treatment for other diseases. But some families say many drug users aren't getting the inpatient care they need.
Aug. 16, 2015
In the foothills of the Himalayas, Lobsang Phuntsok built the Jhamtse Gatsal Children's Community for kids from troubled backgrounds. It's the subject of a documentary, Tashi and the Monk.
Aug. 16, 2015
One of the leading figures of the civil rights movement, Julian Bond, has died. NPR's Rachel Martin remembers him in a conversation with another giant of that era, Georgia Congressman John Lewis.
Aug. 16, 2015
Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton's campaign has stepped up its response to the investigation into the private email server she used while secretary of state.
Aug. 16, 2015
The turboprop reportedly lost contact with the ground on approach to the central Papua city of Oksibil.
Aug. 16, 2015
Julian Bond, a civil rights activist and longtime board chairman of the NAACP, died Saturday night, according to the Southern Poverty Law Center.
Aug. 16, 2015
At New Orleans exhibits commemorating the 10th anniversary of the hurricane, NPR's Neda Ulaby found three artists who said they wouldn't have become artists if it hadn't been for the storm.
Aug. 16, 2015
Through recipes and biographical vignettes, author Cara Nicoletti's new book brings literature to life. Nicoletti tells NPR's Rachel Martin that food has always been part of her reading.
Aug. 16, 2015
More Americans are using mizuko kuyo to grieve the loss of a child, whether it be from a miscarriage or an abortion. Those who participate say it helps them learn to balance love and loss.
Aug. 15, 2015

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