NPR News

There's a plethora of projects to gather data about the brain, various kinds of cancer and every type of cell in the body. But researchers are struggling to keep up with the information explosion.
Nov. 28, 2016
To develop a new variety of kale tailored to American palates, plant researchers are surveying consumer attitudes on the leafy green. The takeaway so far? "Be less like kale."
Nov. 28, 2016
Since the war on drugs began, some 5,000 people have been killed, 2,000 by police and 3,000 in extrajudicial killings. Reporter Michael Sullivan has been following the war in one Manila neighborhood.
Nov. 28, 2016
The university's emergency management division tweeted at 11:30 a.m. local time that the scene was secure and that shelter in place warnings were now lifted.
Nov. 28, 2016
Kolaches have been a Lone Star staple for a long time, and some have even taken on a sausage-and-jalapeño twist. Now their popularity is expanding, with both big and small companies getting onboard.
Nov. 28, 2016
The judge in the federal trial of Dylann Roof, who is accused of murdering nine people in the basement of a historically black church, has ruled that the defendant may represent himself in court.
Nov. 28, 2016
Through the eyes of those who work to make companies "inclusive," the 2016 election suggests two things: Business will pick up, but it won't be business as usual.
Nov. 28, 2016
A new museum in Ramallah features the life and times of the late Palestine Liberation Organization leader Yasser Arafat, from his Nobel Peace Prize to his pistol, glasses and bedroom.
Nov. 28, 2016
Rebels have held the eastern side of Aleppo for years. Now pro-government troops have retaken some key neighborhoods. Thousands of civilians are fleeing the fighting.
Nov. 28, 2016
It's the most common learning disability, yet it's still hard to answer the question: What is it? An NPR reporter who has dyslexia talks with other people — young and old — in search of answers.
Nov. 28, 2016
Medical researchers are no longer ignoring the people who have the most to gain — or lose. But as patient advocates become more influential, they risk being co-opted by the biomedical industry.
Nov. 28, 2016
The James Webb Space Telescope is undergoing its final series of tests in NASA workshops. It's designed to take even grander images than the Hubble telescope. But deploying it will be a major feat.
Nov. 28, 2016
The comment from the president-elect claiming widespread voter fraud appears to have come from a right-wing website that has frequently promoted conspiracy theories.
Nov. 28, 2016
NPR's Lulu Garcia-Navarro looks at how Cuba is reacting to the death of former Cuban leader Fidel Castro. He died on Friday at the age of 90.
Nov. 27, 2016
Fillon defeated the more moderate Alain Juppé. Fillon will face candidates from the left and the extreme right in the French presidential election next May.
Nov. 27, 2016
Cards Against Humanity, maker of the game of the same name, celebrated Black Friday by digging a giant hole in the ground, funded by online donations. As of this posting, they're still going.
Nov. 27, 2016
The Consumer Product Safety Commission grabbed the spotlight in recalls of hoverboard scooters and Samsung's Galaxy Note 7 phones. It's a tiny agency with a vast oversight of thousands of products.
Nov. 27, 2016
Turkish officers in Brussels say their government is firing them and sending them home. Some are in hiding or seeking asylum, fearing imprisonment or worse. They deny they were part of a coup attempt.
Nov. 27, 2016
Forces loyal to Syrian president Bashar al-Assad have retaken the largest rebel-held district in the city, Masaken Hanano.
Nov. 27, 2016
Keith Blanchard wrote an article for the Wall Street Journal entitled "Why Hipster Cooking Gizmos Are Killing Cooking." He talks with NPR's Linda Wertheimer about why they bother him so much.
Nov. 27, 2016

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