NPR News

Back in the day — say, up until about a decade or so ago — the big news on April 15 was always about last-minute filers lining up at post offices as the clock ticked down. Now? It's a different story.
April 15, 2014
The safety message is described as a "sort of cross between a Ricky Martin video, mixed with Devo's "Whip It" and a heaping spoonful of Robert Palmer's "Simply Irresistible."
April 15, 2014
People who took a stand against a proposed tax-filing change were part of a "grass-roots" campaign orchestrated to help Intuit, according to non-profit newsroom ProPublica.
April 15, 2014
The bird, which newspapers say stands 6 feet, can run 40 mph and is "capable of disemboweling a human," escaped last month from a farm in Hertfordshire after apparently being spooked by a local hunt.
April 15, 2014
Apple's Bluetooth-based customer tracking system, iBeacon, just got better, if you ask marketers. But privacy researchers aren't so sure.
April 15, 2014
Italy's former prime minister was convicted of tax fraud. For a year, he must work at least four hours a week at a facility for the elderly. Also, a travel restriction will limit his politicking.
April 15, 2014
On this April 15, Americans are thinking about the Boston Marathon bombings that occurred a year ago. A moment of silence will be observed at 2:49 p.m., the time of the first explosion.
April 15, 2014
When Democrats took control of Colorado's statehouse, they pushed through gun control, civil unions and environmental bills. Then voters pushed back, and Sen. Mark Udall is feeling the fallout.
April 15, 2014
Democratic Gov. Dannel Malloy is one of the nation's most vulnerable incumbents, thanks to a weak economy. He's hoping to eke out a win using policies and strategies favored by the president.
April 15, 2014
As family members of those killed Sunday outside Jewish centers near Kansas City speak, they're focusing on fond memories of their lost loved ones. But they're crushed by the gunman's senseless acts.
April 15, 2014
Demi Clark was just feet from finishing the 2013 Boston Marathon when her life changed forever as a bomb went off next to the course. Now she's back for another go and a chance to inspire others.
April 15, 2014
As special forces try to dislodge armed men who are occupying government buildings in eastern Ukraine, Russia's role in those protests "seems much more evident," NPR's Ari Shapiro reports.
April 15, 2014
A recent study on immigrant job-seekers in the United Kingdom reminds us again of the importance of code-switching: unwritten cultural codes in conversation can have far-reaching impacts.
April 15, 2014
The view was great across much of the Americas early Tuesday as the moon turned red during a total lunar eclipse. If you missed it, the next one comes on Oct. 8.
April 15, 2014
To see if low blood sugar sours even good relationships, scientists used an unusual tool: voodoo dolls representing spouses. As hunger levels rose, so did the number of pins.
April 15, 2014
Millions signed up for health insurance through state exchanges and HealthCare.gov. But another several million bypassed the exchanges and bought health coverage directly from insurers.
April 15, 2014
A tablet computer assembled in Port-au-Prince makes the Western Hemisphere's poorest nation the latest player on the high-tech stage. Economists hope such jobs help grow Haiti's middle class.
April 15, 2014
Not all whole grain breads are created equal. Choosing breads with fully intact grains (think nuggets of whole rye, wheat or millet) may help control blood sugar and stave off hunger.
April 15, 2014
The bloody 1989 crackdown in Beijing changed China, explains NPR's Louisa Lim in a new book. She also chronicles the brutal repression that took place in another city — and remained hidden until now.
April 15, 2014
For women, lower average career earnings translate into smaller Social Security payments. Acting Social Security Commissioner Carolyn Colvin says women shouldn't wait to start saving for retirement.
April 15, 2014

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