KJZZ News

How Individuality Could Be The Core Of Civil Rights
The phrase “civil rights” evokes so many elements of recent American history, and there has been a tendency to associate those protections to groups of people, rather than individuals. ASU Law Professor Zachary Kramer explores, however, how individuality could be at the core of civil rights.
Oct. 9, 2019
AZ Republicans May Be Shifting On Trump Impeachment
Arizona Gov. Doug Ducey late Monday argued the Democrats in Washington should gather all the facts before deeming actions taken by President Trump improper.
Oct. 9, 2019
The Takeaway: Grappling With Gun Control In Washington, And Kansas City
Gun reform legislation in Washington stalls, and a mass shooting occurred in Kansas City, Kansas.
Oct. 9, 2019
Two Guys On Your Head: Prescribing Social Activity
Most of us know what we need to do to be healthy, even if we don't always do it. However, when a doctor prescribes a medication for what ails us, we might take it more seriously. What happens psychologically when a doctor prescribes a social activity to heal our ills?
Oct. 9, 2019
Mexico To Review Legislation For Uber, Other Ride-Hailing Services
Mexican authorities agreed to review the country's legal framework for ride-hailing services such as Uber, after taxi drivers in multiple cities on Monday blocked major avenues and access to the capital's international airport.
Oct. 9, 2019
New Highway Signs Will Honor Native American Veterans
New highway signs recognizing Arizona’s Native American veterans will be unveiled this weekend. Parts of state and federal highways will be renamed Navajo Code Talkers Highway and Hopi Code Talkers Highway, among others.
Oct. 9, 2019
Execution Of Navajo Man Put On Hold
A federal appeals court has stayed the execution of a Navajo man convicted of the murder of two fellow tribal members. He was scheduled to be put to death Dec. 11.
Oct. 9, 2019
Word S2 E3: All The Worlds A Stage
Word is a KJZZ podcast about the literary arts in Arizona and the region. In this third episode of Season 2, “All the World’s a Stage.” If so, what are theater directors doing to include more diversity on it?
Oct. 9, 2019
Q&AZ: Why Doesnt Phoenix Have Passenger Train Service?
Phoenix is the largest city in the country without passenger train service. But it wasn’t always that way. Phoenix’s Union Station was a bustling train hub when rail travel peaked around World War II. Today, it sits dormant as Amtrak stopped its service to Phoenix in June 1996.
Oct. 9, 2019
Maricopa County Assessor Accused Of Adoption Fraud Scheme
Paul Petersen, the Maricopa County assessor, faces more than 30 felony charges just in Arizona, Attorney General Mark Brnovich said at a news conference Wednesday. The allegations are connected to a so-called adoption fraud scheme.
Oct. 8, 2019
Asarco Copper Workers May Strike Waiting For Final Contract
Arizona copper workers may strike soon, awaiting a final contract offer on pay and benefits. Employees of Tucson-based copper producer Asarco may vote to strike this week after working without a new contract since last November.
Oct. 8, 2019
AZ Republic Management Warns Staff Against Unionizing
The management at the state's largest newspaper is warning staffers that any move to unionize actually could lose them some of their current benefits.
Oct. 8, 2019
Chinese Company To Open Engineered Sand Facility In AZ
A Chinese company will open its first U.S. manufacturing facility in Yuma. Rechsand will develop, produce and distribute green building materials from desert sand.
Oct. 8, 2019
Arizona Approves New License For Southwest Key Shelter
Southwest Key Programs has been approved for a new state license needed to reopen the last of the Arizona shelters for migrant children that the Texas-based nonprofit agreed to close last year.
Oct. 8, 2019
CBP Enforcement Actions Increased By 88% In Fiscal 2019
In fiscal year 2019, CBP’s enforcement actions on the Southwest border totaled nearly 1 million — 88% higher than 2018.
Oct. 8, 2019
New UA Research Looks At Challenges Of Treating Sepsis Patients
New research from the University of Arizona College of Medicine could reduce the number of deaths from sepsis, a life-threatening infection. The Centers for Disease Control reports one-point-seven million adults are diagnosed with sepsis each year. One in 5 patients don’t survive.
Oct. 8, 2019
Report Assesses Threat Of Terrorism 18 Years After 9/11
The terror attacks of September 11, 2001 caused Americans to dramatically change perspectives on safety in the broader sense. Would the country be subject to unexpected, tragic events carried out by foreign-based groups like Al Qaeda or, more recently, ISIS?
Oct. 8, 2019
More Than Half Of Arizona Students Fail AzMERIT Tests
The latest statewide standardized English and math test results were released Monday: 42% of students passed either test compared to 41% last year. These scores build on slight increases since Arizona first rolled out the test in 2015.
Oct. 8, 2019
Lawsuit Challenging Bears Ears Reduction Continues
A federal judge has rejected the Trump Administration’s efforts to dismiss a lawsuit challenging its reduction of Bears Ears National Monument in Utah.
Oct. 8, 2019
New Tempe Apartment Limits Renters Younger Than 21
An apartment complex planned for downtown Tempe could be inviting legal trouble with a proposed plan to limit renters under 21.
Oct. 8, 2019

Pages