KJZZ News

Dispute In Payson May Settle Confusing Recall Laws
There’s a legal battle going on in the northern Arizona town of Payson that you might not have heard about. It all started with an effort to force a recall election of Payson Mayor Tom Morrisey, and now the case may end up settling a longtime quirk in the state's laws concerning recalls.
Nov. 12, 2019
1,680 Dams Found At Risk Across U.S., 16 Are In Arizona
A two-year investigation by the Associated Press found almost 1,700 dams pose a risk nationwide. Of the 1,680 dams in question, 16 of them are in Arizona. To learn more about the investigation into Arizona dams, The Show reached out to Felicia Fonseca, the Associated Press’s northern Arizona reporter.
Nov. 12, 2019
Documentary Shows Challenges In AZ Child Welfare System
Mary Jo Pitzl has seen personally how gaps in accountability and government resources have deeply impacted the state child welfare system. With the help of her colleague videographer David Wallace, Pitzl has spent the last year and a half working on a documentary they’re calling “They Have Names.”
Nov. 12, 2019
Queer Eyes Karamo Affirms Diversity, Family In New Book
Not every family looks the same. That’s just one of the lessons "Queer Eye's" culture guru Karamo Brown wants you to take away from the new children’s book he penned with his son, Jason "Rachel" Brown.
Nov. 12, 2019
Page Turner: Uncanny Valley
The memoir "Uncanny Valley" is expected to be released early next year, but Morgan Miller got an early read. Miller is a co-owner of Antigone Books in Tucson, and was a little surprised she liked Anna Wiener’s debut book as much as she did.
Nov. 12, 2019
MLBs Bud Selig Recounts Changes In Baseball In New Book
Baseball’s popularity has been surpassed by football, but the costs have soared. One extremely important figure in those changes and baseball’s overall competitive landscape is Bud Selig, who recently wrote a book on his experience as MLB's commissioner.
Nov. 12, 2019
Grand Avenue Residents May Face Gentrification
As Phoenix continues to grow, some districts with long held identities are being forced to change, for better or worse. Consider Grand Avenue, a home to artists and small business owners that some believe is going through a period of gentrification.
Nov. 12, 2019
NASAs Methane Emissions Study Identifies Top Polluters In CA
A few hundred sites in California are responsible for more than a third of the state's total methane emissions. Researchers believe data collected from the study might help mitigate future emissions.
Nov. 12, 2019
Gilbert Opens First Cemetery After Nearly 100 Years
The town of Gilbert has gone almost 100 years without its own cemetery. But that changed Tuesday as phase one of a new cemetery opened.
Nov. 12, 2019
The Takeaway: Public Impeachment Hearings Pose New Challenge For The Media
The public impeachment hearings begin in the House of Representatives on Wednesday. Supporters of President Donald Trump continue to denounce the proceedings. But opponents say it’s necessary for the public to hear the testimonies.
Nov. 12, 2019
Evo Morales Flees Crisis-Torn Bolivia For Mexico
Evo Morales, who transformed Bolivia as its first indigenous president, was flying to exile in Mexico on Tuesday after weeks of violent protests, leaving behind a confused power vacuum in the Andean nation. Morales flew out on a Mexican government plane late Monday hours after being granted asylum.
Nov. 12, 2019
2nd Trial Against Activist Who Helped Migrants To Begin
The federal government will again make a case against an Arizona border activist accused of harboring immigrants who snuck across the U.S.-Mexico border but who says he was simply helping two men in need.
Nov. 12, 2019
As AZ Republicans Defend Trump, Cindy McCain Calls Them Out
Arizona's Republican congressional members stay committed to Trump as impeachment investigation prepares to go public this week. Over the weekend, Cindy McCain wondered, on CNN's "The Axe Files," if the Republicans' will to speak freely died along with her husband, the late Senator John McCain.
Nov. 12, 2019
Where Will Phoenix Put Bus Rapid Transit?
Light rail isn’t the only public transit option expanding in Phoenix. The city is also working on bus rapid transit. It’s cheaper than light rail and can move more people faster than traditional bus service.
Nov. 12, 2019
Arizona Group Wants To Invest In Women-Led Companies
A new group in Arizona is looking for women led companies that need financial backing to grow. Golden Seeds is a New York-based angel investment firm focused on women-led ventures. Mara Babin helped start the newest chapter in Arizona because she and others saw a need.
Nov. 12, 2019
DACA Recipients In D.C. For SCOTUS Hearing
It’s taken a little more than two years for DACA to reach the U.S. Supreme Court. But the questions before the court have little to do with whether nearly 25,000 Arizonans have earned a shot at citizenship.
Promise Arizona: DACA Recipients Have Faced Enough Uncertainty
Nov. 12, 2019
Q&AZ: Why Is Yuma High Schools Mascot The Criminal?
Through our Q&AZ reporting project, a listener asked KJZZ to explain the story behind Yuma High School’s mascot. As it turns out, despite the connotations associated with their namesake, Yuma’s students, staff and alumni are proud to call themselves criminals.
Nov. 12, 2019
How Should Phoenix Spend $130 Million? You Can Weigh In
Over the next five years, Phoenix expects to get about $130 million from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development. But before the city can collect, it must gather community input. Here's how the money could be spent.
Nov. 12, 2019
Vets Honored At Annual Veterans Day Parade In Phoenix
Phoenix-area residents came out in droves today to honor military veterans for the annual parade march down Central Avenue in Phoenix. Vintage war planes flew over the city to start the parade which incorporated a traveling gallery of veterans portraits.
Nov. 11, 2019
APM Reports: Soldiers For Peace
During the Vietnam War, roughly one in five GIs actively opposed the conflict. Many servicemen and women came to believe they were not liberating the country from communism but acting as agents of tyranny. In the combat zone, they rebelled against their commanders' orders. At home, they staged massive protests.
Nov. 11, 2019

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