KJZZ News

Highline Fire
The Highline Fire near Payson has burned nearly 1,000 acres in the past week. Officials are worried that rising temperatures could make containing it more difficult.
Jun. 13, 2017
money
The casino industry's largest lobbying group in the U.S. is ramping up its efforts this week to repeal a 25-year-old federal law that bans sports betting in most states, including Arizona.
Jun. 13, 2017
water faucet
The city of Tempe recently announced levels of a harmful contaminant in its water violated an EPA standard.
Jun. 13, 2017
SRP
The 9th Circuit Court of Appeals ruled utility company Salt River Project is not immune from anti-trust lawsuits when setting customers’ rates.
Jun. 13, 2017
the pulse logo
When her daughter was born in January, the first thing Maria Rios checked was the baby's head.
Jun. 13, 2017
the takeaway logo
Despite criticizing Democrats for a lack of transparency when passing Obamacare in 2009, Republicans have held no public hearings as they work through their own healthcare bill.
Jun. 13, 2017
Black hole
Our universe — or at least what scientists know about it — seemed to get a little larger earlier this month. That’s when the Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory, or LIGO, spotted two black holes merging 3 billion light years away from Earth.
Jun. 13, 2017
Citing state laws on epidemics, the state's top health official wants Gov. Doug Ducey to give her more powers to deal with opioid overdoses, including the ability to identify and track individual patients.
Jun. 13, 2017
It appears the two remaining insurance companies offering coverage under the federal health-care exchange in Arizona will stay in the market through at least 2018.
Jun. 13, 2017
Attorney General Jeff Sessions is testifying before the Senate Intelligence Committee on Tuesday, as the investigation continues into Russian attempts to influence the 2016 presidential election.
Jun. 13, 2017
child at the doctor
Congress continues to hash out health care and questions remain about how Arizona will fare. The state has struggled with a high number of uninsured children in recent years, but that’s beginning to change. Unless Congress acts by the end of the year, some say the state could backslide again.
Jun. 13, 2017
Bears Ears
Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke has recommended the president and Congress shrink the size of Bears Ears National Monument in southern Utah.
Jun. 13, 2017
arizona storytellers
In 2009, Rafael Carranza landed his first reporting job on the Texas-Mexico border.
Jun. 13, 2017
Financial jobs office
In December 2016, there were 4.4 million people employed in Los Angeles County, which leads the nation in job numbers. Maricopa County ranked sixth as largest employed county nationwide.
Jun. 13, 2017
wrong way signs
The Arizona Department of Transportation is implementing new thermal cameras to detect wrong-way freeway drivers. The $3.7 million project is being installed along a 15-mile stretch of I-17 between I-10 to the south and northern segment of Loop 101.
Jun. 13, 2017
injection table
A potential settlement is on the table in the lawsuit against Arizona’s death penalty, and the deal would limit the state’s ability to improvise during an execution.
Jun. 12, 2017
Gila River Arena
The owner of the Arizona Coyotes has bought out all of the team’s minority stakeholders. From NHL sources confirmed the sale on Monday, as well as a search for a new team CEO.
Jun. 12, 2017
F-35
F-35 fighter jets are still grounded at Luke Air Force Base in Glendale. U.S. Air Force officials had planned to resume operations Monday after halting operations last week.
Jun. 12, 2017
Interracial relationships wedding rings
Fifty years ago, the Supreme Court issued its landmark decision in Loving v. Virginia. That ruling overturned laws in the U.S. that had barred interracial marriage. And over the course of the last half-century, there have been dramatic increases in the number of people marrying someone of a different race or ethnicity.
Jun. 12, 2017
High school
This year, yearbooks became a little more complicated. With the divisive rhetoric and political rancor surrounding the 2016 presidential election, students and yearbook editors around the country had to tackle the challenge of how to document one of the most polarizing times in our country’s history.
Jun. 12, 2017

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