KJZZ News

Nogales to Vote On Concertina Wire Border Project
As the military continues uncoiling new strands of sharp concertina wire on the border border fence in Nogales, Arizona, local city officials are pushing back.
Feb. 5, 2019
Hacienda HealthCare Misses Deadline
The state of Arizona ordered a long-term care facility where an incapacitated woman was sexually assaulted to have a third party oversee operations. But, the two companies couldn’t reach an expected agreement.
Feb. 5, 2019
Tempe Tracing Opioid Use Through Wastewater
The study looks at trace amounts of heroin, fentanyl, oxycodone and codeine found in Tempe’s wastewater.
Feb. 5, 2019
Maricopa Toxicology Lab Closing, Outsourcing To PA
The Maricopa Medical Examiner's Office is closing its toxicology lab next month and, according to The Arizona Republic, outsourcing incoming work to privately-operated Pennsylvania lab NMS Laboratories.
Feb. 5, 2019
Republicans Warn Against National Emergency Declaration
President Trump has repeatedly talked about declaring an emergency at the country’s southern border, which would allow him to allocate money to build a wall there, without needing Congress’ approval. Several Senate Republicans have said they would not support that move.
Feb. 5, 2019
50 Arizona Racehorses Put Down Last Season
It’s a thrilling moment for both jockey and fans when a racehorse makes it across the finish line, but some startling new numbers show racehorse injuries have been on the rise at Arizona tracks.
Feb. 5, 2019
Racial, Economic Inequality Are Key Issues For 2020
Racial and economic inequality are issues that have been raised frequently by political candidates — more often than not on the progressive side of the aisle.
Feb. 5, 2019
Is There A Way To Bridge The Political, Civil Divide?
Dramatic political disagreements have continued in 2019, with Democratic control of the U.S. House leading to more head-to-head battles. The most intense led to the month-long partial government shutdown as President Trump vowed not to approve any measure that didn’t include $5 billion for a new border wall.
Feb. 5, 2019
Sinemas Clothing Choices Become Draw Of Reporting
Kyrsten Sinema became Arizona’s first female U.S. Senator when she was sworn in last month. But she didn’t just make headlines for her historic achievement, there was also a lot of talk about what she wore.
Feb. 5, 2019
Colorectal Cancer Found In Younger And Younger Adults
For decades, incidents of colorectal cancer were mostly found in people over the age of 55, and obesity was often a factor. The latest statistics from the American Cancer Society, though, show that rates for adults under 55 have steadily been rising over the past 20 years or so.
Feb. 5, 2019
Interaction Of Companies, Colleges Explored In Book
In the early to mid 1990s, the University of Oregon wasn’t widely known for its success in the so-called revenue sports like football and men’s basketball. But that trajectory dramatically changed when the university became closely aligned with Nike and its founder — Oregon alum Phil Knight.
Feb. 5, 2019
AZ School Chief Calls For Repeal Of No Promo Homo Law
In her first ever State of Education speech, Superintendent Kathy Hoffman told members of the House Education Committee on Monday that the system needs to support the emotional well-being of students. She said that means "creating an inclusive environment that supports children from all backgrounds.''
Feb. 5, 2019
Tax Fight At Legislature Puts Tax Returns In Legal Limbo
Arizona taxpayers who are ready to start filing their state returns are in a sort of legal and financial limbo because of a fight over income taxes between Gov. Doug Ducey and Republican lawmakers.
Feb. 5, 2019
KUNC: Western Water Managers Bet On Cloud Seeding, Despite Gaps In Science
A lot of the current water scarcity problems in the Southwest could be eased if it just snowed more and with a regular frequency in the high country of Colorado, Utah and Wyoming. More snow means more time to deal with the Colorado River's fundamental supply and demand imbalance.
Feb. 5, 2019
The Takeaway: U.S. Weapons Ending Up In Hands Of Al Qaeda
In 2018, eight journalists were killed in war-torn Yemen, and few western journalists have been able to report consistently from within the country. That challenge of access to a country facing famine, cholera and bloodshed has led some to call it “the forgotten war.”
Feb. 5, 2019
The Pulse: Why Opposition To GMOs Is A First World Privilege
Mehta had heard that GMOs were controversial in Europe and the U.S. But it wasn’t until he arrived in Zurich that he discovered just how controversial they were.
Feb. 5, 2019
The Takeaway: Nickel And Dimed For Federal Government Court Documents
Anyone can access any federal court document in America through Public Access to Court Electronic Records (PACER) which is the system for accessing federal court documents. The going rate is $0.10 a page. That might seem low, but some experts estimate that it costs only half of one ten-thousandth of a penny to send out a page.
Feb. 5, 2019
WATCH: Trumps State Of The Union Address
President Donald Trump delivered his State of the Union on Tuesday. NPR reporters covering the White House, Congress and more annotated his remarks and the Democratic response live, adding context and analysis.
Feb. 5, 2019
Supreme Court Investigating David Stringer
The Arizona Supreme Court says it cannot find state Rep. David Stringer’s application to practice law in the state. Critics wanted to know if he disclosed the fact that he was arrested on multiple charges including child pornography when he was living in Maryland in the 1980s.
Feb. 4, 2019
Arizona Storytellers: Millie Hollandbeck
Millie Hollandbeck grew up in a small town in Ohio. Her parents are deaf but she can hear. Millie can remember interpreting for her parents from a young age while she was at the doctor's office, the post office, and grocery store.
Feb. 4, 2019

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