KJZZ News

Arizona Lawmakers Debate Updating 1872 Mining Laws
A mining law created in 1872 was the focus of the Energy and Mineral Resources Subcommittee Thursday morning. Congressman Raul Grijalva, chair of the committee, has introduced a bill that would overhaul that century-old law and the way hardrock mining is conducted.
May. 9, 2019
Poll: Arizonans Support Dual-Language Immersion Classes
In 2000, voters in Arizona passed a so-called “English-only” law, which requires students who don’t speak English to be placed in what’s called Structured English Immersion programs, where they learn English apart from every other subject. Those programs, however, have been met with a lot of criticism.
May. 9, 2019
The Takeaway: Checking The Checks and Balances
As the fight between House Democrats and the White House continues to escalate, are the checks and balances between the branches of the government working?
May. 9, 2019
Pima County Reverses Decision To Accept Funds From DHS
The Pima County Board of Supervisors reversed a decision from last year when the panel rejected a $1.5 million Department of Homeland Security grant as part of Operation Stonegarden.
May. 9, 2019
New AZ Law Adds Restrictions To Citizen Ballot Initiatives
The bar to get a citizen initiative on the ballot in Arizona may be rising.
May. 9, 2019
Hualapai Hopes Water Settlement Finally Happens This Congress
The Hualapai Tribe on the south rim of the Grand Canyon is hoping its federal water settlement will finally become law.
May. 9, 2019
Podcast Playlist: Against The Rules
In his new podcast, Michael Lewis, the author of "Moneyball" and "The Big Short" sets out to explore the role of referees in everyday life, from basketball courts to courts of law.
May. 9, 2019
Sounds Of The City: Everything From Your Blue And Green Bins Passes Through Here
Listen to the sounds of Stacey Hettmansperger at a Phoenix Transfer Station, monitoring the sorting of recyclables, trash and compost.
May. 9, 2019
Man Beaten By 5 Mesa Police Officers Files Federal Lawsuit
Lawyers for a black man shown on video being beaten by five Mesa police officers last year have filed a federal lawsuit against the city and three of the policemen. Attorneys for Robert Johnson said Tuesday they are seeking a jury trial for their client and at least $2 million in compensation for the May 2018 incident.
May. 9, 2019
New Law Requires Teachers To Get Suicide Prevention Training
Teachers, counselors and principals in Arizona public school districts and charter schools must receive suicide awareness and prevention training at least every three years under legislation signed by Gov. Doug Ducey.
May. 9, 2019
A Tale Of 2 Hospitals: County Hospital
Phoenix-based architecture firm Lescher & Mahoney built hundreds of schools, hospitals and buildings across Arizona for a large portion of the 20th century. One building designed in the firm’s final years as an independent business was the county-run Maricopa Medical Center. This is story behind the hospital, which is set to be demolished.
Part I: Maricopa County Public Health Care Today
May. 9, 2019
April Border Crossings Set Another Record
The new numbers coincided with a slew of border officials appearing before a Senate Judiciary subcommittee. Border Patrol chief Carla Provost warned agents are overwhelmed.
May. 9, 2019
Trial For Migrant Aid Volunteer Ends As Felony Trial Looms
Scott Warren is the last of nine defendants charged with federal misdemeanor crimes for leaving food and water out on a national wildlife refuge in southern Arizona.
May. 9, 2019
Supima Partners To Develop Origin Mapping For Cotton
A company that tests and verifies components in textiles has now mapped all Supima cotton growing regions in the U.S. Supima is also the name of the Tempe-based company that promotes U.S. cotton producers of this type.
May. 9, 2019
U.S. Man Charged For
Authorities in Nogales, Mexico arrested a man who is facing federal charges in Phoenix for allegedly running a “Ponzi scheme,” according to a news release from the Sonoran Attorney General’s Office. He was arrested for violating the conditions of his pretrial release.
May. 9, 2019
BLM Considers Allowing More Visitors At Hiking Spot
One of the most exclusive and dramatic hiking spots in the southwestern United States could see bigger crowds under a new proposal unveiled Wednesday. The Bureau of Land Management is weighing increasing its daily visitor limits from 20 to 96 people a day at The Wave, a popular rock formation near the Utah-Arizona border.
May. 9, 2019
NPS OKs Grand Canyon Pipeline Project
The National Park Service on Wednesday gave the green light to replace a critical transcanyon pipeline at the Grand Canyon.
May. 8, 2019
Navajo Sign National Research Agreement
The Navajo Nation has signed the first tribal data-sharing agreement for nationwide research. The agreement allows for Johns Hopkins University and other researchers to build a large-scale database.
May. 8, 2019
AMLO Blames U.S. Political Interests For Tomato Crisis
Trade tensions between Mexico and the U.S. are currently centered in one of the quintessential ingredients of BLT sandwiches, salsas and Italian-American food: tomatoes. While the U.S. imposes a tariff on this Mexican produce, the president of Mexico speaks up, accusing electoral interests in the U.S.
May. 8, 2019
AZ House Passes Requirements for Signature Gatherers
Republican in the Arizona House passed a bill to set more regulations for people who collect signatures for ballot measures.
May. 8, 2019

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