More High Pollution Days Could Hurt Those With Lung Disease

July 03, 2014

The number of high ozone alerts vary from year to year, but are most common during the Valley’s hot summer months. And rising temperatures could create complications for people with respiratory problems.

Temperatures in the Southwest are projected to rise by several degrees in the coming years, depending on which climate change model you’re looking at. And though temperature is just one factor that contributes to pollution, ozone warnings and extremely hot days tend to coincide.

Julie Reid, Executive Director of the American Lung Association’s Phoenix office, said high pollution days are often worst for people with lung diseases, such as asthma, chronic bronchitis, COPD and emphysema.

"We do hope to see that there is more legislation around air quality and reducing carbon emissions," Reid said. "Also, I think it’s important for everyone to really know what your community’s air pollution plans are and support the state and local efforts to clean up the air."

Reid said there are ways to reduce ozone pollution that you might not expect, like filling up your car’s tank at night or using push mowers to cut your lawn.